PLATINUM2024

Wild Earth Allies

Protecting Our Natural World, Together

Chevy Chase, MD   |  https://wildearthallies.org/
GuideStar Charity Check

Wild Earth Allies

EIN: 04-2730954


Mission

Our mission is to protect vital areas of our natural world for the benefit of wildlife, habitats, and people by inspiring collaborative action.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please contact us if you have any questions or would like more detail on our Theory of Change or focus of our three-year strategy 2024-2026.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Ms. Katie Frohardt

Main address

2 Wisconsin Circle Suite 900

Chevy Chase, MD 20815 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fauna Preservation Society

Fauna & Flora International, Inc.

EIN

04-2730954

Subject area info

Climate change

Water resources

Wildlife biodiversity

Plant biodiversity

Forest preservation

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Women

Indigenous peoples

Extremely poor people

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Management & Technical Assistance (S02)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our natural world faces unprecedented threats from rapid development and habitat loss, illegal wildlife trade, and a changing climate. Asian elephants have lost 85% of their historic range, and population numbers are plummeting. Grauer’s gorillas have suffered a 60% reduction in fewer than 25 years due to poaching and habitat loss, and now join other great apes as critically endangered. Hawksbill turtles are under intense threat from illegal wildlife trade and destruction of nesting and foraging habitats. And more than 15% of earth’s known tree species are facing extinction. In response, we collaborate with a wide network of partners to catalyze change. Working together in support of carefully selected initiatives, we believe we can better address critical challenges to protecting the wildlife and habitats that are so important to our global biodiversity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Great Apes

Myriad pressures - poaching, habitat loss, civil conflict - place great apes at risk. Our mountain gorilla conservation efforts in Central Africa span more than 20 years and we now use these lessons to help turn the tide for Grauer’s gorillas in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Together with primatologist Dr. Augustin K. Basabose, founder of the Congolese NGO Primate Expertise, we work in the upland sector of Kahuzi-Biega National Park and in adjacent Indigenous Batwa communities. In Rwanda we partner with the women-led cooperative Imbereheza Gahunga to build household rainwater harvest tanks, improving community well-being while eliminating the need to enter gorilla habitat to gather water.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples
Women
Extremely poor people

Marine ecosystems are among the most threatened, having lost 67% of mangroves and 29% of seagrasses globally. Sea turtle populations around the world also face severe pressures from egg poaching, incompatible coastal development, and destructive fishing practices. In El Salvador, we work with ProCosta to protect the critically endangered Hawksbill and in Cambodia, we are developing a new marine protected area. Across these programs, we work to address threats to marine turtles and their habitats through protection of key nesting and foraging sites, population research, community outreach, sustainable livelihoods development, and promotion of policy reforms and marine protected areas.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Women
Children and youth
Extremely poor people
Indigenous peoples

An estimated 10,000 of the tree species that cover the globe are in danger of extinction due to overharvesting, habitat loss, and climate change. We focus on conserving at-risk trees and restoring forests in our priority landscapes, building partnerships with field partners as well as with botanical institutions and universities to mitigate key threats and increase engagement for tree and forest conservation. Current priorities include the Trees of Belize Project and the Great Cypress Swamp in Delaware, as well as expansion of community tree nurseries across our portfolio. The latter will improve access to native trees for restoring degraded forests and for local use – decreasing pressures on standing forests and improving community well-being.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Women
Indigenous peoples
Extremely poor people

Cambodia’s deforestation rate is among the world’s highest. Our program is led by Goldman Environmental Prize winner and National Geographic Explorer Tuy Sereivathana (Vathana). Our holistic approach combines ecological monitoring and research of Asian elephant populations; improving habitat management; reducing human-elephant conflicts and improving livelihoods. We work in two of Cambodia’s globally significant forests, Prey Lang and the Cardamoms, and partner with the Indigenous Kuy people, local communities, and government agencies.

Population(s) Served
Extremely poor people
Working poor
Indigenous peoples
Children and youth

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and healthy ecosystems are our greatest defense. They store vast amounts of carbon and deliver myriad economic, environmental, health and cultural benefits. Together with our partners, we are proud to protect over 3.7 million acres of priority terrestrial and marine ecosystems globally. This collaborative action fuels the resilience of communities and endangered wildlife to our changing climate.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Women
Indigenous peoples
Extremely poor people

Where we work

Awards

4-Star Charity 2008

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4-Star Charity 2007

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4-Star Charity 2010

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4-Star Charity 2011

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4-Star Charity 2012

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4-Star Charity 2013

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4-Star Charity 2014

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4-Star Charity 2015

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4-Star Charity 2016

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4-Star Charity 2017

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4-Star Charity 2018

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4-Star Charity 2019

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4-Star Charity 2020

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Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Wildlife Conservation: wildlife species protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Accelerated efforts this year, reducing threats to more species through monitoring/active patrols with government rangers/community members, as evidenced via camera trap footage and direct sightings.

Habitat Conservation: habitat areas with improved conservation management

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Priority areas: Lowland evergreen forest (Prey Lang Forest, Cambodia); Southeast Asian montane forest (Cardamom Mountains, Cambodia); Afro-montane forest (Virunga massif, Kahuzi-Biega NP); + more.

Human well-being: communities engaged and benefiting from our conservation activities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Women, Children and youth, Indigenous peoples, Extremely poor people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our conservation activities benefit human wellbeing through employment, livelihood improvement, enterprises, training, mitigating human-wildlife conflicts, and environmental education.

Collaborative Action: conservation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We work in collaboration with talented local partners across the following sectors: local and national government, community-based, NGO, university, scientific, and communications.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are driven by a mission to determine effective and lasting ways to protect threatened wildlife and habitats. Our longstanding philosophy centers on the belief that investment – technically and financially – in carefully chosen local institutions and individuals is key to turning the tide of wildlife and habitat loss. We believe conservation can be accelerated through these collaborative partnerships, and that together we can encourage the sort of exchange and learning that drives improved practice and lasting change. We also recognize the important linkages between healthy ecosystems and human wellbeing, so we collaborate with local partners to accelerate conservation in culturally appropriate ways while sustaining traditional livelihoods. We select our priority initiatives with great care, looking into each for a pressing need and a genuine opportunity to catalyze change.

Our approach begins by identifying globally important wildlife and habitats that can be conserved through targeted collaborative action. Next, we foster local partnerships that result in lasting conservation impact. By limiting bureaucracy and overhead, we maximize impact on the ground. Wildlife: We conserve imperiled wildlife species through community-based patrols and protection, as well as environmental education and outreach. Habitats: We protect threatened critical habitats through direct protection as well as integrated land-use planning and management. Shared Learning: We facilitate an honest exchange of ideas and experiences, promote cooperative best practices, and support alternative livelihoods to accelerate conservation success.

Since 1981, we have worked to protect threatened wildlife and habitats around the world. We recognize that protecting wildlife and habitats begins with people who combine passion, integrity, entrepreneurial spirit, and extensive experience in the field. We are proud that these traits define our team.

We work with those living closest to the natural resources we protect to maximize program sustainability and ensure cultural alignment. Our partners are at the center of our work and the forefront of their respective fields. Our colleagues include conservation experts with extensive field experience, with several having received international awards including National Geographic Explorer and the Goldman Environmental Prize.

Our U.S. leadership team holds a collective 50+ years of fieldwork, program design and administration in international biodiversity conservation and natural resources management. We are governed by an active Board of Directors who bring a depth of expertise in science, law, finance, art, and philanthropy to ensure we operate to the highest standards in pursuit of our mission.

As reflected in our spring 2022 Impact Report:

For decades, we have been implementing community-based conservation, innovating and learning with talented local partners in field sites globally. These key collaborative actions deliver measurable impact for wildlife, habitats and people:

Know the Biodiversity: Much of the planet’s biodiversity is still under-documented, making it difficult to manage effectively. Along Cambodia’s coast, we survey coral reefs and seagrass meadows to help design a new marine protected area. In Belize, our botanist is creating the first country-wide inventory of tree species – and our tally is 1,297 and counting. Our biomonitoring in field sites globally delivers critical data for mobilizing government and civil society support for protection.

Strengthen Protection: Identifying pressures and putting in place strong mitigation plans are essential for strong protection. In DRC, our partner Primate Expertise has not lost one gorilla to snaring since increasing antipoaching patrols and community engagement. In El Salvador, with partner ProCosta and a dedicated community network we protect nesting hawksbill turtles and release 30,000+ hatchlings each year. In Cambodia, we protect 1.7 million acres of Asian elephant habitat and train fishers to patrol locally-managed marine areas.

Enhance Livelihoods: At the heart of our work is a focus on sustainable livelihoods and increasing community access to essential natural resources. We collaborate with a women-led cooperative in Rwanda to build household water tanks, with coastal villages in Cambodia to patrol community fisheries, and with Indigenous Batwa and Kuy families in DRC and Cambodia to grow trees and gardens. In El Salvador, 150 community members earned income protecting and releasing turtle hatchlings. These efforts increase financial and physical health and reduce environmental pressures.

Restore Degraded Habitat: Habitat restoration is a core conservation strategy. In DRC we germinate seeds collected from ape dung. To date, nurseries have yielded over 30,000 “ape tree” seedlings, improving well-being of Indigenous Batwa families and reforesting 370 park acres. In Cambodia, with coastal communities we replant mangroves and install artificial reefs to promote seagrass and oyster recovery. In the U.S. with Delaware Wild Lands, we are rewilding the 10,800-acre Great Cypress Swamp, recently planting 37,000 native Atlantic white cedar and bald cypress trees in this vital forested wetland.

Engage the Next Generation: We have launched a Fellows program to create pathways for diverse talent to build skills in conservation. Our first Fellow in Rwanda is documenting how water tanks improve family well-being and reduce pressures on wildlife. In DRC, we facilitate nature clubs in 11 schools, and in Cambodia, we mentor university students in marine research. Globally, we stimulate next-generation interest and involvement through environmental education and outreach.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, Community partners actively engage in program design, implementation, and adaptive management.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, Our external communications share voices of community members and program beneficiaries directly.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.25

Average of 5.04 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.9

Average of 4.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16%

Average of 17% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Wild Earth Allies

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wild Earth Allies

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Wild Earth Allies

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Wild Earth Allies’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$111,730 -$101,172 $454,977 $903,228 $1,186,144
As % of expenses -4.9% -4.7% 22.0% 33.6% 37.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$142,897 -$126,922 $445,477 $903,228 $1,176,611
As % of expenses -6.2% -5.8% 21.5% 33.6% 36.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,893,966 $1,990,778 $3,046,599 $3,486,419 $4,471,527
Total revenue, % change over prior year -12.1% 5.1% 53.0% 14.4% 28.3%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.6% 5.7% 1.8%
All other grants and contributions 93.2% 94.3% 99.3% 94.2% 97.0%
Other revenue 6.8% 5.7% 0.2% 0.1% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,264,332 $2,173,038 $2,063,751 $2,684,794 $3,197,196
Total expenses, % change over prior year -28.7% -4.0% -5.0% 30.1% 19.1%
Personnel 40.1% 42.6% 46.1% 34.7% 34.4%
Professional fees 16.1% 18.9% 10.0% 8.7% 4.9%
Occupancy 8.5% 8.6% 8.1% 5.8% 4.9%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.3%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 14.6% 28.8% 30.4%
All other expenses 35.3% 29.9% 21.1% 22.0% 25.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,295,499 $2,198,788 $2,073,251 $2,684,794 $3,206,729
One month of savings $188,694 $181,087 $171,979 $223,733 $266,433
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $169,400 $0
Fixed asset additions $50,167 $0 $0 $42,900 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,534,360 $2,379,875 $2,245,230 $3,120,827 $3,473,162

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 1.8 1.1 8.7 10.6 5.9
Months of cash and investments 1.8 1.1 8.7 10.6 13.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.1 3.6 6.4 8.8 11.8
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $330,977 $200,497 $1,498,837 $2,363,451 $1,569,698
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,999,510
Receivables $976,959 $873,837 $885,897 $520,630 $479,975
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $28,500 $28,500 $28,500 $42,900 $71,400
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 33.3% 66.7% 100.0% 0.0% 53.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 26.7% 22.5% 24.5% 12.8% 17.9%
Unrestricted net assets $786,888 $659,966 $1,105,443 $2,008,671 $3,185,282
Temporarily restricted net assets $284,461 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $284,461 $203,373 $731,244 $629,641 $664,829
Total net assets $1,071,349 $863,339 $1,836,687 $2,638,312 $3,850,111

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Katie Frohardt

With over over three decades of experience, Katie is a recognized non-profit leader, field practitioner, and international conservationist. At the helm since 2003, and leading our re-branding in 2016, Katie focuses on delivering the Wild Earth Allies mission to protect vital areas of our natural world for the benefit of wildlife, habitats and people by inspiring collaborative action. Her grounded leadership style draws from years spent living in Rwanda as director of the International Gorilla Conservation Program and as program technical director for the African Wildlife Foundation. Her earlier career included grant-making with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, private sector natural resource management consulting, and land use planning. She holds a masters degree from the Yale School of the Environment, where she combined study of landscape ecology with coursework at the Yale School of Management on applied economics and nonprofit management.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Wild Earth Allies

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Wild Earth Allies

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Wild Earth Allies

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Clea Newman Soderlund

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Ms. Virginia Busch

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Virginia Busch

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C. Jonathan Fischer

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Beth Ann Ruoff

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Karen Winnick

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David Hamlin

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Jo-Elle Mogerman

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Steven Rosenthal

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Mohamed Bakarr

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Sophie Oppenheimer

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/23/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/28/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.