PLATINUM2023

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Reconnecting America's Warriors

Lutherville Timonium, MD   |  www.warriorreunionfoundation.org
GuideStar Charity Check

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

EIN: 81-5360521


Mission

Warrior Reunion Foundation supports combat veterans in overcoming the challenges of post-military transition by reconnecting those who served together overseas. We challenge stigma through shared experience, rebuilding essential peer support networks that enable our veterans to live with meaning, purpose and positive impact in their communities.

Ruling year info

2017

CEO & Founder

James Ferguson

Main address

PO Box 5796

Lutherville Timonium, MD 21094 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-5360521

Subject area info

Vocational education

Health care access

Mental health counseling

Physical fitness

Employment

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Families

Caregivers

Retired people

Students

Military personnel

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We cannot send our warriors to battle together and expect them to recover alone. Warrior Reunion Foundation connects our nation's combat veterans with the one resource they need most - each other. We reconnect brothers and sisters in arms, combating stigma through shared experience and providing educational resources and actionable connections to other veteran support organizations to help connect our warriors with the support they need for success in life after service. Warrior Reunion Foundation addresses the isolation many combat veterans feel when separated from those with whom they served by giving them the opportunity to renew those bonds and refocus together for their next mission in life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Unit Reunion Program

Studies commissioned by the Department of Veterans Affairs, The RAND corporation, the Kaiser Family Foundation and others all say the same thing – Peer Support programs are one of the most effective methods to assist our nation’s veterans in overcoming transition challenges and PTSD. Unfortunately, despite the documented effectiveness of Peer Support, many of our nation’s veterans do not have access to this type of care, or are hesitant to engage with groups of “peers” who are in fact strangers. Our organization has a different approach. Warrior Reunion Foundation connects combat veterans with the peers that experienced their most formative years together – the “battle buddies” they served next to in combat! Our model is unique. No one else does what we do, and we do it with the effectiveness of a team founded and led by combat veterans who innately understand the needs of the community we serve. Moreover, we deliver our reunions at no-cost to those we serve.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Veterans
Adults
Families
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans

Related Program

Unit Reunion Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

WRF has reunited over 2500 combat veterans & Gold Star Families at no cost to each unit we've served.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans

Related Program

Unit Reunion Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

WRF has held over 40 reunions to reconnect combat veterans & Gold Star Families. We also sponsor smaller gatherings through our Small Unit Programs.

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans

Related Program

Unit Reunion Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of our post-reunion survey respondents would recommend attending a WRF reunion to other combat veterans.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans

Related Program

Unit Reunion Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

100% of participants report satisfaction with their reunion experience.

Number of participants reporting change in behavior or cessation of activity

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans

Related Program

Unit Reunion Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Before attending their reunion, only 30% of participants were likely to reach out to their veteran peers for support. After attending a WRF reunion, over 94% reported they were likely to reach out.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

No two WRF reunions are alike. Our experienced team guides each unit through a detailed planning process that typically takes 3-6 months in order to plan and execute a successful reunion mission. Our sole purpose is to support each unit in realizing their reunion vision. While many organizations focus on hand-outs, we focus on mutual support and capacity development, with the goal of ensuring that each unit’s reunion is planned by their members, for their members. This increases ownership, engagement and commitment; leading to positive outcomes that endure long after the reunion mission is complete. Each reunion’s sequence of events is built around our pillars of Service, Wellness and Camaraderie. How Are We Different?
Capacity Building: We don’t do “handouts.” Our reunions are a partnership between our team and the units we support. We build capacity within each unit, giving them the tools and experience they need to plan future gatherings to ensure their connection remains strong. This is accomplished through good old-fashioned sweat equity: each unit is required to establish a “unit planning committee” of 3-5 members that works alongside our team through a guided 6 month reunion planning process. The unit planning committee makes the decisions for their reunion, coordinates amongst all unit members, and is responsible for ensuring mission success.
Proactive Connections to Actionable Resources: During our planning process we work with each unit to identify the areas of support that best address the prevailing issues facing their members. Based on that assessment of needs we invite representatives from partner organizations to brief at the reunion, putting best-in-breed Veteran Support Organizations (VSOs) directly in front of our reunion attendees. Surrounded by those with whom they served, our attendees are able to talk openly about their challenges. This stigma-free environment, coupled with personal connections to pre-screened resources that match their identified areas of need results in increased engagement with follow-on care.
Enduring Peer Support: Our reunions serve to rekindle the special bond shared by those in attendance, resulting in an enduring connection between the members of the unit. Through private Facebook groups created during their reunion planning process, unit members have a forum to reach out for support when needed. Our program ensures that no veteran is without a connection to brothers and sisters in arms as they strive to pursue life’s next mission.

Our organization connects with local community organizations and national level partners to identify locations that meet the requirement for hosting a reunion. We have developed partnerships with a host of vendors who supply all the logistical requirements for each reunion.

Our organization is founded and operated by combat veterans. We know the population we serve and we know the need because we have personally benefited from attending our own unit reunion. Planning unit reunions is akin to planning a military field operation, only this time the mission is to reconnect America's warriors. We have executed 28 successful unit reunions and have all the planning expertise and vendor relationships necessary to deliver successful reunions in communities across the United States. We offer a guided planning process that comprises every step required to deliver a successful reunion event, and have a full time planning staff that works with each unit we support to ensure the reunion accomplishes their vision.

In the five years since our founding, Warrior Reunion Foundation has reunited over 1500 combat veterans and Gold Star Family members across 28 reunions, provided at no cost to each unit we’ve served. In 2021 alone, WRF executed 11 reunions with over 400 veterans and Gold Star Families at locations in Maryland, Indiana, Montana, Tennessee, Alabama, Ohio, and Texas. 2022 will be our largest year yet with 12 reunions. Our schedule features 5 Army, 1 National Guard, and 6 Marine units covering combat deployments from Grenada in 1983 through Iraq/Afghanistan in 2012.

Measurable Outcomes – According to our post-reunion surveys:
• Before attending their reunion, only 30% of participants were "likely" to reach out to their veteran peers for support. After attending a WRF reunion, over 70% reported they were "highly likely" to reach out for support when needed.
This confirms that attending a WRF reunion has more than doubled peer support engagement by our veteran attendees.
• Over 70% of post-reunion survey respondents had not seen members of their unit in over 5 years.
• Over 97% of post-reunion survey respondents said that attending their reunion “strengthened their social connections with their military family.”
• 100% of survey respondents would recommend attending a reunion sponsored by Warrior Reunion Foundation to their veteran peers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

92.46

Average of 15.41 over 6 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

11.1

Average of 7 over 6 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 8% over 6 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $62,985 $73,016 $101,969 $63,826 $170,616
As % of expenses 39.4% 31.4% 26.9% 13.1% 35.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $62,985 $72,488 $101,969 $63,826 $170,216
As % of expenses 39.4% 31.1% 26.9% 13.1% 34.8%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $222,647 $305,558 $481,214 $550,232 $581,603
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 37.2% 57.5% 14.3% 5.7%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 4.1% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 95.9% 100.0% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $159,662 $232,542 $379,245 $486,406 $488,155
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 45.6% 63.1% 28.3% 0.4%
Personnel 35.2% 24.0% 38.1% 33.9% 39.1%
Professional fees 62.6% 73.9% 55.4% 62.1% 7.4%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 2.2% 2.2% 6.5% 3.9% 53.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $159,662 $233,070 $379,245 $486,406 $488,555
One month of savings $13,305 $19,379 $31,604 $40,534 $40,680
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $2,000
Total full costs (estimated) $172,967 $252,449 $410,849 $526,940 $531,235

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.7 8.6 8.5 8.2 11.1
Months of cash and investments 5.7 8.6 8.5 8.2 12.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.7 8.6 8.5 8.2 12.3
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $75,329 $165,886 $267,855 $331,681 $452,449
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $50,791
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $20,000
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $2,000
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 20.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.0%
Unrestricted net assets $75,329 $165,886 $267,855 $331,681 $501,897
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $20,000
Total net assets $75,329 $165,886 $267,855 $331,681 $521,897

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO & Founder

James Ferguson

James Ferguson served as an active duty Marine officer from 2007-2013. Following his active duty service he began a career as a healthcare executive, developing specialty and behavioral health care programs that serve the active-duty military and veteran community. James launched Warrior Reunion Foundation after planning a reunion for the Marines he led into combat in Afghanistan in 2010. His unit reunion led to his realization that every unit deployed to combat together would benefit from reconnecting, remembering battles won and the sacrifice of those lost, and renewing bonds of brotherhood to support success in their next mission in life.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

WARRIOR REUNION FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 06/08/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

James Ferguson

Brown Advisory

Term: 2017 -

Michael Quilty

Surrey Capital

Clifford Cornell

Tradition Financial Services

Andrew St. Cyr

Wild Bill's Craft Beverage Co.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/27/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data