PLATINUM2024

Chicago Foundation for Women

aka CFW   |   Chicago, IL   |  http://www.cfw.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

Chicago Foundation for Women

EIN: 36-3348160


Mission

Chicago Foundation for Women invests in women and girls as catalysts, building stronger communities for all.

Ruling year info

1985

Interim President and CEO

Mrs. Sunny Fischer

Main address

140 S. Dearborn St. Suite 400

Chicago, IL 60603 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3348160

Subject area info

Health care access

Reproductive health care

Leadership development

Freedom from violence and torture

Reproductive rights

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Women and girls

NTEE code info

Public Foundations (T30)

Women's Rights (R24)

Women's Rights (R24)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Chicago Foundation for Women (CFW) is a community foundation working to advance gender equity, which is inherently interconnected with racial justice, economic justice, and health equity. CFW invests in women and girls as catalysts, building strong communities for all. CFW supports organizations and individual leaders working to solve the biggest problems facing women and girls: economic insecurity, violence, and access to healthcare and information. CFW invests in developing women leaders and advocates, and brings together diverse coalitions to collaborate, share resources and develop solutions. CFW envisions a world in which all women, girls, trans and gender non-binary people have the opportunity to thrive in safe, just and healthy communities. CFW values the strength and wisdom that comes from all voices and embraces the complexities of the communities we serve.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grantmaking

Since 1985, Chicago Foundation for Women (CFW) has been a leader in the movement to achieve basic rights and equal opportunities for women and girls, investing in them as catalysts to build stronger communities for all. Today, nearly 40 years later, CFW continues to be the only organization in the region to take a comprehensive approach to understand and address the issues impacting Chicago-area women and girls. CFW works with a community of socially-minded investors who share our passion for improving the lives of women and girls, ensuring that every dollar they give achieves maximum impact.

In fiscal year 2023 (July 1 2022 -June 30 2023), $3.4 million in responsive and strategic grants were invested in 202 organizations across the city to impact more than 308,000 women, girls, trans, and gender nonbinary individuals. Since its inception, CFW has awarded more than 4,500 grants totaling over $45 million so that Chicago-area women and girls are healthy, safe, and economically secure.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

The Womens Leadership Development Initiative (WLDI) at CFW includes four programs (Board Member Boot Camp, Core Concept Coaching, CULTIVATE: Women of Color Leadership Initiative, and Willie's Warriors Leadership Initiative) that help build a stronger, more effective and resilient nonprofit sector working toward gender equity. The WLDI is available at no cost to any nonprofit that has received grant support from CFW within the last three years. The goals of the WLDI are to develop diverse and influential nonprofit leaders who can also work together collectively to produce social change. Each year, 300 people are impacted through WLDI.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

In all of its work, the Foundation emphasizes the value and necessity of analyzing economic and social issues through a "gender lens." The Foundation convenes and listens to a wide spectrum of community stakeholders and partners--including grantees, activists, academics, donors, business leaders and policymakers--to inform its stances and participate as a prominent voice for women around major issues confronting the Chicago region.

As a backbone organization, CFW convenes and coordinates the efforts of diverse groups and organizations working to better the lives of women and girls. Women's perspectives and views must be included when developing the policies, systems, and programs that most deeply affect them. At the same time, systemic change requires big picture thinking, coordinated effort, and leadership.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

In addition to grants, CFW provides numerous educational opportunities designed to meet grantees' specific organizational training needs at no cost to participants, thus enabling small organizations with limited budgets to learn from some of the leading trainers in the region to help strengthen the leadership and organizational sustainability of our grantee partners. Our Core Concepts Coaching program provides individualized instruction on topics such as financial management, board development, communications, and fundraising.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

About
The Response, Recovery, and Resilience (R3) Fund at Chicago Foundation for Women will invest in women and their families as they emerge from the immediate COVID-19 crisis and serve as a key resource for the Chicago nonprofit sector serving women and girls as they take stock, recalibrate and rebuild. The Fund seeks to provide $2,600,000 in grants over the next year.

Focus
CFW understands that once the immediate crisis subsides, there will be long-term and far-reaching ripples felt, particularly by women. CFW is committed to being here for Chicago’s women and families as they recover, both physically and economically. As such, CFW will provide the capital, programming and additional support needed for a three-phase response:

Phase 1: RESPONSE
GOAL: Provide emergency relief for the most urgent needs, such as food and housing, and provide organizations targeted technical assistance. Harness this unprecedented opportunity for advocacy and systemic change to bring to light the most critical issues impacting women and girls, particularly those not rising into the limelight.

Phase 2: RECOVERY
GOAL: Provide capital, capacity building and additional support to organizations to help them recover from the physical and economic toll of the Covid-19 pandemic and sustain their services in the immediate aftermath.

Phase 3: RESILIENCE
GOAL: Work with organizations serving the needs of Chicago-area women and girls, provide them multi-year support and closely partner with them over a period of time so they have the increased capacity to sustain themselves, for the long-term. With CFW’s close partnership, these organizations will rebuild upon an even-stronger foundation, one that centers gender equity and racial justice in everything they do.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Bisexuals, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Bisexuals, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Dollars donated to support advocacy efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Bisexuals, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Bisexuals, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Bisexuals, Intersex people, Lesbians, Transgender people

Related Program

Leadership Development and Organizational Capacity Building

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CFW’s current strategic plan, Developing Leaders, Leading Change, is a road map for expanded impact via growth in CFW’s leadership development efforts and catalyzing the work of others in support of our mission. Now entering the fifth year of the plan, CFW continues to maintain its focus on supporting economic security, access to health care, and freedom from violence for women and girls, while undertaking a significant initiative to build and lead a growing Equity Network to move our region toward CFW’s vision to achieve gender equity for Chicago’s women and girls within a generation. It is an ambitious goal, but one we believe is possible through smart, targeted investments and collective buy-in. The specific goals outlined in the strategic plan are: 1) CFW leverages our impact by developing women leaders and expanding the capacity of organizations that directly advance our mission; 2) CFW leads, connects and supports individuals and institutions working to achieve gender equity in the Chicago region by 2030; and 3) CFW expands our capacity for impact through sustained and substantial growth of our asset base. Through collective impact, CFW seeks to achieve large-scale system change.

CFW takes a three-pronged approach to achieve its mission: 1) advocating for underserved women and girls; 2) providing grant support to both emerging and established organizations; and 3) offering an innovative array of leadership development and capacity building programming. Serving as a backbone organization, CFW convenes and coordinates the efforts of diverse groups and organizations working to better the lives of women and girls. Through collective impact, CFW seeks to achieve large-scale system change.

With deep roots in the community, CFW remains at the forefront of identifying the next challenges for women and girls. CFW supports organizations serving the needs of women and girls throughout the Chicago region (Cook, Lake, DuPage, Will, McHenry and Kane counties). CFW aims to create a Chicago in which all women have access to comprehensive health services; where women and girls thrive from violence; where all women receive equal pay for equal work, and where women have the resources to invest in their futures, their families and their communities. To address these key issues, CFW uses an integrated approach serving as a convener, grantmaker, and developer of diverse leaders.

Since its inception in 1985, CFW has been a leading voice in the effort to achieve basic rights and equal opportunities for women and girls. Today - nearly 40 years later - CFW has grown significantly to be a critical partner in the global womens funding movement. CFW recognizes that few community problems can be resolved without programs and strategies that intentionally address the needs of women and girls. To date, the Foundation has awarded nearly 4,000 grants to hundreds of organizations totaling nearly $39 million. In addition, CFWs investments in coalitions and advocacy, as well as our own work building the leadership of advocates have helped to support the passage of 31 pieces of pro-women-and-girls legislation over the past four years. This has included the Equal Rights Amendment in Illinois, the No Salary History law that strengthens the Illinois Equal Pay Act, the Illinois Reproductive Health Act and a statewide sexual harassment law. Thanks to the past, sustained support of these movements and their infrastructure, even in times of more intense political opposition, CFW and our partners have been able to harness the opportunity of the current political climate to drive progressive change. As a result, Illinois is increasingly becoming a bastion for womens rights in a nationally polarizing and oppressive sociopolitical context.

However, a great deal of work still needs to be done to address continuing gender inequalities. COVID-19 has made plain the preexisting, structural gender inequities facing our region and our country. For 35 years, CFW has been at the frontlines alongside our grantee partners, fighting against this inequity that is now top of mind for our society. As this virus rages on, women are disproportionately represented on the front lines of this fight and in industries crippled by the economic fallout leaving them, many of whom are the primary breadwinner for their families, with reduced or no income and oftentimes, no health, sick leave or childcare benefits at all. It is the unfortunate reality that women, particularly Women of Color, are quite literally carrying the burden of this pandemic on their backs. Women are also losing their jobs at a higher rate than men. A recent report released by the Institute for Womens Policy Research highlights just how deep these disparities run. Since February, 701,000 jobs have been lost across the U.S., the majoritynearly 60 percentby women. These numbers are likely outdated as more people are losing their jobs daily.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Chicago Foundation for Women
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2021 Form 990 2021 CFW Audited Financial Statements, 2021 and 2022
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10.02

Average of 41.62 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.1

Average of 3.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

20%

Average of 18% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Chicago Foundation for Women

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Chicago Foundation for Women

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Chicago Foundation for Women

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Chicago Foundation for Women’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $427,504 $24,514 $1,024,188 -$3,328,905 -$1,281,116
As % of expenses 7.9% 0.5% 19.1% -52.2% -20.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $423,685 $19,530 $1,019,460 -$3,336,688 -$1,289,388
As % of expenses 7.9% 0.4% 19.0% -52.3% -20.2%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $8,723,665 $5,591,095 $5,080,080 $10,062,657 $7,924,915
Total revenue, % change over prior year 75.6% -35.9% -9.1% 98.1% -21.2%
Program services revenue 0.3% 0.2% 0.0% 0.2% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 7.0% 10.5% 11.0% 6.0% 8.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.4% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 69.6% 91.1% 69.9% 86.7% 87.1%
Other revenue 23.0% -1.7% 19.1% 4.7% 4.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $5,385,737 $4,800,542 $5,362,916 $6,376,693 $6,389,169
Total expenses, % change over prior year 10.8% -10.9% 11.7% 18.9% 0.2%
Personnel 25.2% 30.5% 23.1% 27.0% 27.0%
Professional fees 10.2% 11.0% 7.9% 9.0% 11.1%
Occupancy 2.4% 2.8% 1.8% 1.7% 2.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 52.8% 48.0% 59.8% 54.1% 53.5%
All other expenses 9.5% 7.7% 7.3% 8.2% 6.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $5,389,556 $4,805,526 $5,367,644 $6,384,476 $6,397,441
One month of savings $448,811 $400,045 $446,910 $531,391 $532,431
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $239,150 $0
Fixed asset additions $4,982 $0 $8,648 $14,914 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $5,843,349 $5,205,571 $5,823,202 $7,169,931 $6,929,872

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 1.1 2.9 3.2 8.5 5.1
Months of cash and investments 36.8 42.6 45.2 36.5 41.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 19.0 21.4 21.4 11.7 9.3
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $510,300 $1,151,061 $1,449,966 $4,512,075 $2,705,458
Investments $16,009,010 $15,873,502 $18,737,139 $14,888,526 $19,173,758
Receivables $722,965 $276,440 $101,683 $595,000 $1,363,476
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $94,320 $94,320 $102,968 $100,275 $100,275
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 72.2% 77.5% 75.6% 67.8% 76.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.6% 1.3% 6.1% 2.5% 9.2%
Unrestricted net assets $8,557,861 $8,577,391 $9,596,851 $6,260,163 $4,970,775
Temporarily restricted net assets $2,360,724 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $6,164,831 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $8,525,555 $8,590,739 $9,568,527 $13,356,375 $16,570,182
Total net assets $17,083,416 $17,168,130 $19,165,378 $19,616,538 $21,540,957

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Interim President and CEO

Mrs. Sunny Fischer

Sunny Fischer is a seasoned professional working with foundations and non-profit organizations on strategy, planning, program evaluation, facilitation, and organizational governance. She has special expertise in arts and culture, community design, women's rights, and public housing, and is one of the four original "Founding Mothers" at Chicago Foundation for Women.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Chicago Foundation for Women

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Chicago Foundation for Women

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Chicago Foundation for Women

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Jessica Sohl

HC Technologies, LLC

Term: 2023 -

Naila Alexander

Manager, PWC

Joan Bacon

Community Volunteer

Alicia Bailey

Head of Production, National Association of Realtors

Fraya Hirschberg Black

Manager, PWC

Rebecca Brokmeier

Managing Director, KPMG

Deborah B. Cole

Partner, Hoogendorn & Talbot LLP

Regina S. Cross

Vice President, Investment Management, Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC

Tanya G. Davis

Co-Owner, Trendsetters Lab

Lauren Densham

Head of Impact and ESG, Energize Ventures

Jessyca Dudley

Founder & CEO, Bold Ventures

Erica Duncan

Regional Banking Director - Private Banking, West PNC Bank

Georgina Heard-Labonne

Strategic Planning Manager, Illinois Department of Transportation

Emily Lonigro

Owner, LimeRed

Norman Jones

Director - Global University Recruitment, Danaher Corporation

Susan (Susie) Kurowski

Partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP

Jill Lyons

Advertising Executive, Hawkeye Agency

Anita Mital

Financial Advisor, Northwestern Mutual

Angela L. Putnam

Chief Accounting Officer, First Midwest Bancorp

Anel Ruiz

Culloton + Bauer Luce

Jessica Sohl

President and Partner, HC Technologies

Gretchen M. Wolf

Partner - Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP

Ann Marie Wright

COO Commercial Banking, BMO Harris Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.