PLATINUM2024

Fraternity Without Borders US

Fraternity


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Fraternity Without Borders US

EIN: 83-0543368


Mission

Fraternity Without Borders' mission is to "foster and promote the spirit of fraternity, embracing individuals from all backgrounds, regardless of ethnicity, location, or religious beliefs. We are dedicated to providing a safe haven, primarily for children and adolescents facing vulnerability or social challenges". We are a Non-Profit Organization whose aim is towards solidarity, charity, and as the name of the organization implies, promotes universal fraternity. We focus on the poorest regions of the world to establish shelters in places where hunger, misery, and helplessness turn innocents into victims every day.

Ruling year info

2018

President

Angelita De Paula

Vice President

Luisa Marteleto

Main address

415 East 75th St 8

New York, NY 10021 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

83-0543368

Subject area info

Cultural awareness

Orchestral music

Education

Philanthropy

Health

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Ethnic and racial groups

Immigrants and migrants

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

Victims and oppressed people

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Fraternity Without Borders’ mission is to "foster and promote the spirit of fraternity, embracing individuals from all backgrounds, regardless of ethnicity, location, or religious beliefs. We are dedicated to providing a safe haven, primarily for children and adolescents facing vulnerability or social challenges". Fraternity without Borders US is a nonprofit humanitarian organization which aim is towards solidarity and charity. As the name of the organization implies, we want to promote universal fraternity and focus our work on the poorest regions of the world. Our goal is to provide shelter for the displaced, provide food for the hungry, bring hope for the helpless, and for those living in extreme poverty.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Field's Mothers

Women refugees in Malawi need our help to feed their children.
They are surviving in one of the poorest countries in the world. War refugees, widows, alone with their children, women are desperate to get something to eat and to feed their children. In many cases, they have to surrender to prostitution and suffer abuse in order not to die of hunger.

The first seeds of this action have already been sown. Fraternity Without Borders bought an area of 5 hectares, where these mothers can work and contribute to the project’s sustainability.

Population(s) Served
Family relationships
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Ethnic and racial groups
Women and girls
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The community learn how to make biochar – the energy that comes from nature, provides income and is not harmful to health.
The solution arrived in July 2018 in Madagascar, in the Fraternity City, where 1,500 briquettes are produced daily. In December of that year, the workshop was offered in Malawi with love by the volunteers and received with interest and dedication by the local workers.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In 2021, the capacity to take in children at the Ubuntu School was expanded. The graduation of 90 pre-school students who went on to elementary school was celebrated. With the opening of the new classes, the children have the chance to continue their studies, new teachers were hired, received educational training based on the method.

Currently, more than 350 students are enrolled in kindergarten and elementary school, in addition to more than 60 babies the daycare facility. These children receive food, school supplies, and school uniforms.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People of African descent
Victims and oppressed people
Children and youth

Orphan children live in a world of violence and vulnerability on the streets of Bukavu, Goma, and other locations in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Every day, they struggle to survive fear, hunger, and hope to be seen with love.
Thousands of children are destitute because of the conflicts in the country. Your sponsorship can transform this reality and give them a new future!

The project started with supporting orphanages and currently runs a shelter to provide food, housing, education, medical care, and security for orphan children, mothers, and pregnant women from the aftermath of armed conflicts in the country.

Population(s) Served
Women
Children and youth
People of African descent
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Fraternity Without Borders runs community building projects to create sustainable change in Mozambique, one of the most economically underdeveloped countries in the world.

The people of Mozambique have been decimated by HIV, malaria and poverty. Over 1 million people suffer from hunger and consume contaminated water. In fact, it is common to go three days without food and to walk miles to collect liters of unsafe drinking water.

The most vulnerable are hungry, orphan children who lost parents to HIV and malaria. They work in exchange of a plate of food and do not go to school.
Fraternity Without Borders is making a lasting impact. We address the orphans’ immediate needs and organize communities for permanent change. We house and feed the orphaned children, and we work to rebuild communities so there are opportunities now and for future generations.
We maintain 24 Centers in Mozambican villages located within an area of 700 kilometers, from Barragem, near Maputo, to Chicualacuala.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people
People of African descent
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Madagascar, the island and land of lemurs, is best known for animated movies and nature documentaries, but little is known about the population and their poverty. This is a place where almost half of the children under five suffer from chronic malnutrition and lack access to clean drinking water. Children take a bath only when it rains. Malnutrition and lack of hygiene creates a breeding ground for diseases such as taeniasis, Neurocysticercosis and tungiasis, among others.

When Fraternity Without Borders arrived on the island of Madagascar in February of 2017, we found families living in extreme poverty, suffering from hunger, thirst, and without access to basic hygiene. Currently, we maintain two community centers, where we assist approximately 3,000 people and provide access to education, meals, medical, and dental care.

Since water is one of the biggest problems and challenges in the region, through generous donations FWB drilled the first water well in 2019.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Cross-border families
Children and youth
People with diseases and illnesses
Economically disadvantaged people

It is estimated that at least 30,000 children are homeless in Senegal’s capital, Dakar. According to the United Nations, Dakar has one of the largest concentration of street children in the world. Thousands of children are vulnerable to physical abuse and neglect.

In order to help, a group of volunteers established the orphanage, Chemin Du Futur (Path to the Future), to nurture and educate these young people.

Since 2011, Fraternity Without Borders has supported this project through our sponsors’ monthly donations. The orphanage provides the children a disciplined routine, education, health care, music, sports and vocational training. We also cultivate an on-site vegetable garden and run a poultry farm with the goal of making the project self-sustaining, as it provides vocational training for these young people.

Through the continued support of our sponsors, we are working together to make profitable activities like this thrive and to provide support to more street children.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Children and youth

Fraternity on the Streets is a project that aims to help people who are experiencing homelessness in the United States. In addition to hunger, thirst, and cold these people are daily victims of many judgments of society, which make their lives even more difficult.

The objective of this project is to practice solidarity free from any prejudice, seeing people as they are: human beings! For this, volunteers collect food, clothes, shoes, blankets, towels and hygiene products and to provide the homeless during periodic actions throughout the year.

There are currently three project chapters. The first one is located in Las Vegas/NV. The second one is in New York/NY and the third in Denver/CO.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Unemployed people
Multiracial people
Religious groups
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Children diagnosed with a rare disease called Epidermolysis Bullosa receive special treatment and care at the NGO Jardim das Borboletas (Butterfly Garden) in Caculé, Bahia. The disease, which affects the skin is serious, non-contagious, and incurable, leaving wounds sensitive even to water. The Fraternity without Borders (FWB) has embraced this initiative to help maintain this work full of love and hope.

Today, sponsorship will provide these children with the chance of a better condition of life, through the purchase of high-cost medicines and dressings.

The treatment of EB is expensive; on average, it can cost between R$3,000 and R$40,000 per month for each patient. This amount includes the purchase of bandages, supplements, ointments, and medical care. With such a costly treatment, many patients depend exclusively on the work of the project to have more quality of life and less pain.

Apart from medicines, the children need clothes and a better quality of life in terms of housing.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
People of Latin American descent
Multiracial people
People of African descent
Economically disadvantaged people

Fraternity on the Streets is a project that aims to help people who are experiencing homelessness in the United States. In addition to hunger, thirst and cold, these people are daily victims of many judgments of society, making their daily lives even more difficult.

The objective of this project is to practice solidarity free from any prejudice, seeing people as they are: human beings! For this, volunteers collect food, clothes, shoes, blankets, towels and hygiene products and take them to them in periodic actions throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Fraternidade Sem Fronteiras 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Madagascar Action

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fraternity Without Borders directly provides 153,000 meals per year to 420 children that come to our school. They receive breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snack on a daily basis.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization aims to continue to increase its projects’ capabilities in the Sub-Saharan countries, expand our Fraternity on the Streets project in the US and Brazil, as well as increase the number of beneficiaries from other relevant projects that we support in Brazil.

We aim to feed and educate children and youth to help them break free from their cycle of hunger, extreme poverty, and violence. We aim to teach African communities to develop sustainable farming to eradicate hunger. We aim to contribute to the creation of a more peaceful world.

Our strategy is to continue to bring awareness to the world about what we can do together to feed those that are hungry, to treat those that are in pain, to shelter war’s refugees and orphan children, and to offer hope and dignity to unsheltered individuals.

Fraternity Without Borders partnership with other organizations to fund and or manage existing humanitarian projects, we receive grants, we work directly with well-known worldwide humanitarian organizations to together accomplish bigger goals, we operate with total transparency, we have volunteers that donate their time to run our organization globally, and we count on millions of donors to support our work.

Since 2009, Fraternidade Sem Fronteiras, a Brazilian nonprofit organization, has been working in the sub-Saharan countries in Africa and in Brazil. The organization has been sustaining its projects by raising donations in Brazil to create and develop our humanitarian work globally.

Five years ago, Angelita de Paula, a New York resident, learned about Fraternidade sem Fronteiras, and its extensive work in Africa. Fraternidade sem Fronteiras was founded in 2009 by Wagner Moura, a Brazilian servant that had a “call of the heart” to initiate a humanitarian movement in Africa.

In 2018, Angelita founded Fraternity Without Borders, an affiliated organization in the US, to bring awareness about our projects in Brazil and Africa. In 2020, our organization launched the Fraternity on the Streets program in New York, followed by Las Vegas, Boston, and Denver in 2021. Each project serves between 100-200 unsheltered individuals per week.

Today, we bring awareness of our global developed projects to the United States. We maintain our humanitarian projects by raising donations in Brazil, United States, United Kingdom, Switzerland, and Canada.

Our founder, Wagner Moura, has been living in Malawi since 2021. Wagner serves the African communities and understands first-hand their needs and how to help them in a way that their culture and values are respected. Fraternidade Sem Fronteiras has a board of directors formed of professionals that volunteer their time to strategize our fraternal work.

We have a representative of our organization living in each of our projects in Africa, which assures that our work follows the vision and strategy of our founder as well we are achieving expected results. Our organization employs locals to build, cook, teach, and help with the success of our work in Africa.

Our work is only possible because of the kindness of millions of hearts that sponsor our projects.

Our commitment to the communities t we serve and commitment to continue to welcome as many people as possible years to come make us tireless workers.

Fraternity Without Borders US join forces with our Brazilian organization and our other affiliated to operate in some of the poorest places in the world, bringing hope and a strong desire to help to end hunger and build a peaceful world. With that in mind, the result of our social impact since 2009 has reached the following:
34,000 people sheltered
74 community centers built
1,182 children sent to school
580,000 meals served per month
22 Wells drilled
14 youth sent to college
6 graduated from college
599 elderlies assisted
3 bakeries built
579 jobs created for locals
199 houses built
22 workshops
Work in the African Continent
• Build and maintain shelters for refugees and orphan children.
• Drill wells to provide clean water to communities.
• Provide food for the communities we serve.
• Build and maintain homes and schools.
• Provide children’s school enrollment, school supplies and transportation.
• Provide vocational training, continuing education, professional training, and workshops.
• Encourage cultural activities.
• Teach communities how to start and maintain sustainable food cultivation.
• Provide medical and dental care and maintain community clinics.
• Teach basic hygiene.
• Build nutritional centers.
• Create employment opportunities by hiring local workers to staff the Community Centers, including cooks, social educators, labors, and administrative assistants.
• Teach communities to make biochar – the energy that comes from nature.
Work in Brazil:
• Support treatment of children born with microcephaly by offering customized treatment plans, including: individualized treatment plans, occupation, speech and physical therapy, counseling, medical care, specialized diets,
Support treatment of the children born with epidermolysis bullosa by providing bandages, supplements, ointments, clothes, and medical care.
 Build homes for families in remote areas where they face drought and food scarcity.
 Provide education.
 Enable disadvantaged children and youth access to music education and opportunity to play in the Emmanuel Youth Philharmonic Orchestra project. Through music, seeks to give a new perspective to young people on the outskirts of the city, by providing instruments and music instruction.
 Welcome immigrants and refugees from the war in Venezuela by providing: Shelter and food, psychological support, Portuguese language classes, vocational training, after school tutoring, resettlement and social assistance, employment opportunities, access to substance use treatment and employment to unsheltered individuals. maintain a welcome center and provide food, haircut, employment placement, medical, psychological, and dental care.
Work in the United States
• Provide food, water, hygiene products, blankets, and winter clothing to unsheltered individuals in New York, NY, Las Vegas, NV, Denver, CO, and Boston, MA.
• Offer “Teaching Without ” initiative, volunteers that teach free English classes to kids in Africa.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals, We talk with other charities to learn and share with them.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Fraternity Without Borders US
Fiscal year: May 01 - Apr 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 0.00 over 5 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.9

Average of 0.8 over 5 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0%

Average of 0% over 5 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fraternity Without Borders US

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: May 01 - Apr 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Fraternity Without Borders US

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: May 01 - Apr 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Fraternity Without Borders US

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: May 01 - Apr 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Fraternity Without Borders US’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $8,750 $2,092 $18,857
As % of expenses 3.1% 0.6% 2.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $8,750 $2,092 $18,857
As % of expenses 3.1% 0.6% 2.3%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $295,267 $366,841 $826,346
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 24.2% 125.3%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $283,473 $364,750 $807,489
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 28.7% 121.4%
Personnel 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Professional fees 0.7% 1.6% 1.0%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 98.6% 97.7% 98.2%
All other expenses 0.7% 0.7% 0.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $283,473 $364,750 $807,489
One month of savings $23,623 $30,396 $67,291
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $307,096 $395,146 $874,780

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 1.8 1.5 0.9
Months of cash and investments 1.8 1.5 0.9
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 1.8 1.5 0.9
Balance sheet composition info 2021 2022 2023
Cash $42,913 $45,005 $63,862
Investments $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $42,913 $45,005 $63,862
Temporarily restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $42,913 $45,005 $63,862

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

Angelita De Paula

Vice President

Luisa Marteleto

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Fraternity Without Borders US

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Fraternity Without Borders US

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Angelita De Paula


Board co-chair

Luisa Marteleto

Fraternity Without Borders US

Term: 2023 - 2026

Wagner Moura

Angelita de Paula

Luisa Marteleto

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/18/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/18/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.