THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Great futures start here.

Greeley, CO   |  www.bgcweld.org
GuideStar Charity Check

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

EIN: 84-0529902


Mission

To inspire and enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, responsible, and caring citizens

Ruling year info

1968

CEO

Mr Terry Adams

Main address

PO Box 812

Greeley, CO 80632 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Boys & Girls Clubs of Greeley, Inc.

EIN

84-0529902

Subject area info

Human services

Youth services

Economics for youth

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

At-risk youth

NTEE code info

Boys Clubs (O21)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Affiliations

See related organizations info

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Research demonstrates the power that quality out-of-school time programs have in building youth assets such as character, resilience, and wellness. Yet across the United States, some 11 million children and teens (1 out of 5) have nowhere to go at the end of the school day. Many are unsupervised and even unsafe as they navigate the time spent waiting for a parent or guardian to return home. During the summer when school is out of session, the number of youth who lack supervision and engagement increases to 43 million youth a day (3 out of 4), significantly increasing exposure to high-risk environments and behavior. Furthermore, children living in lower socioeconomic neighborhoods face additional challenges including inequitable access to educational, recreational, and arts opportunities, and other programs that support positive youth development and build character. That’s where Boys & Girls Clubs of Weld County steps in.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

Education programs complement and reinforce what youth learn during the school day, while creating experiences that invite them to fall in love with learning. Rooted in social-emotional development practices, programs in this area enable all youth to be effective, engaged learners who are on track to graduate with a plan for the future. As an informal learning space, Clubs have an opportunity to offer both remediation and enrichment, all while inviting youth to discover and pursue their passions through experiential learning.

At all developmental stages, education programs prompt youth to plan and prepare for the future. This includes observing and practicing the social-emotional “soft skills” that ladder up to employability, exploring career options, and engaging in programmatic experiences that prepare youth to learn and work beyond high school. Programs and experiences supporting employability encourage youth to explore career options and the postsecondary pathways to their chosen career, develop skills necessary for success in postsecondary education and the workforce, and apply their skills through real-world experiences.

Skills Developed: identifying and solving problems, planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting information, communication, collaboration, perseverance as a learner, goal setting, career awareness, post-secondary awareness, and self-efficacy.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Leadership & Service programs build leadership with self, leadership with others, and leadership within the community. They give youth the confidence and abilities to create meaningful change in their world.

Skills Developed: self-awareness and advocacy, collaboration with peers and adults, goal-setting, identifying and solving problems, social and civic responsibility

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Sports & Recreation programs promote physical health by providing low-risk settings for members to explore moving their bodies and eating healthy foods. These playful experiences build movement skills, such as running and throwing, and nutrition skills, such as choosing healthy foods. Members develop positive attitudes toward physical activity and healthy eating to support a lifetime of healthy decisions.

Skills Developed: perseverance, confidence, physical fitness, locomotion, acrobatic

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Arts (digital, fine, applied and performing arts) programs encourage imagination and self-expression. They also help youth develop knowledge and understanding of specific art forms. Art programs build social-emotional and 21st century skills, such as communication, critical thinking and creativity.

Skills Developed: technical art knowledge, communication, art awareness, cultural awareness, critique and feedback

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Clubs currently have nearly 200 teenage members who receive a host of leadership and personal development opportunities. These include a chance to earn PAID summer employment at the Club in their first professional experience through a program called "Junior Staff." They may also participate in the 'Keystone Club' which is a service/leadership at the Club which provides personal development and leadership opportunities both in the building and out in the community. The Teens also participate in the "Youth of the Year" competition where they can match their academic success, Club service and personal merits in a national competition that begins with a local competition held each year. There are also 'College Tours' where teens are taken outside of their environment and are allowed to visit 4-5 different out-of-the area university campuses each summer.

BGCWC has also invested in 'Teen Late Night' programming which are teen only hours where the teens can have safe, positive and productive social outlets that include music, food, games, tournaments, prizes, etc. BGCWC will be cutting the ribbon on a new expanded, state-of-the art Teen Center at the Pawl Club in September of 2015.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Health & Wellness programs focus on building the physical, social and emotional wellness of youth. These programs provide opportunities to build the foundational skills of developing relationships, regulating emotions and solving problems. These programs also focus on building health promotion skills, such as communication and decision making, through exploring a range of health topics and behaviors, including substance use, sexual behavior and violence.

Skills Developed: Self-efficacy, identifying emotions, identifying and solving problems, resistance skills, and health communication

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Community Partner Award 2012

Greeley-Evans School District Six

H.A.L.O. (Helping And Leading Others) 2012

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

May Tag Dependability Award 2013

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

Bronze MAC Award (Marketing & Communications) 2015

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

Nonprofit Agency of the Year 2015

United Way of Weld County

Affiliations & memberships

Boys and Girls Clubs of America 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Multiracial people, At-risk youth, Children and youth

Related Program

Leadership & Service

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Percentage of youth who feel they demonstrate leadership and teamwork skills. *2020 we were unable to administer our annual survey due to COVID-19

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Percentage of teens with the expectation of Post Secondary Education Completion. *2020 we were unable to administer our annual survey due to COVID-19. Youth served have also decreased.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Multiracial people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Currently rebuilding from COVID-19

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Boys & Girls Clubs positively impact youth from the moment they enter the door. What happens for youth inside a Club—building relationships with staff, participating in fun and engaging programs, learning important skills, making new friends, developing their talents—is referred to as the Club Experience. As an organization committed to youth, BGCWC’s goal is to continually increase the quality and impact of the Club Experience for its members and to expand the Clubs’ reach in the community.

The most important part of the Club Experience is the relationship between the staff and the youth. All BGCWC staff (nearly 80 full-time and part-time employees)—except for the CEO, Vice-President of Finance, and Vice-President of Resource Development—have, as part of their job descriptions, responsibilities for direct and daily interaction with Club members.

Targeted to meet members’ needs and interests, BGCWC’s programs are developed using the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s research-informed Formula for Impact. Offerings are sequenced learning experiences, generally occurring in 8-16 week sessions, with specific objectives for building skills and knowledge. While activities may change to meet the unique needs of each Club and their members, all are designed to provide opportunities to practice communication skills (reading, writing, speaking); problem-solving skills (math, science, technology); healthy living skills (diet, exercise, and avoiding risky behaviors); and character and citizenship skills (civics, volunteerism, and civility) within four broad program areas: Academic Success, Character & Leadership, Health & Wellness, and the Arts.

Through regular attendance and participation in engaging, age-appropriate, and targeted programs in a safe and supportive environment, critical outcomes are achieved. By helping youth succeed in school, keep their brain and bodies strong and healthy, and exposing them to the arts and other creative outlets results not only in enduring change for the participants, but positively impacts a community’s economic, social, and civic health. Studies show that ensuring youth develop into mature, responsible adults results in, for example, lower incarceration rates, fewer unplanned pregnancies, and relying on emergency rooms for health care—and the high societal and economic costs that go with these options. When one invests in youth, the returns lead to leads to a skilled workforce, increased productivity, and engaged and contributing citizens.

In order to provide a world-class Club Experience that assures success is within reach of every young person who enters the doors, and to continually achieve better outcomes for all members, Boys & Girls Clubs of Weld County’s board and senior staff have identified three areas in which to focus over the next five years. These areas are:
• Increasing the number of youth served by adding more Clubs at school-based sites and partner facilities, and improving the capacity of all Clubhouses.
• Improving program quality through targeted and strategic staff recruitment and retention, on-going staff training, and improved curriculum development.
• Expanding program impact through outreach including comprehensive family support services, building relationships with community partners, and improved procedures for Club operations.

Recognized as one of northern Colorado’s premier nonprofits, Boys & Girls Clubs of Weld County offers comprehensive youth development, after-school, and summer programs at three stand-alone Clubhouses and in five schools- and community-based sites in Greeley, Milliken, Fort Lupton, and Galeton. In the fiscal year 2018, BGCWC had over 3,000 registered members and served up to 510 youth per day during the school year, and over 560 youth during the summer months.

Although Club members represent all socio-economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds, a large majority of BGCWC members experience volatile home lives, cope with language barriers, and face food, housing, and economic insecurity. Members are closely split between males (55%) and females (45%); 54% qualify for free or reduced lunch; 47% live in a single-parent household and are 54% Hispanic/Latino. These demographics match—or exceed—those for Weld County in general, a county where the number of individuals under the age of 18 grew 103% between 1996 and 2016.

Despite these challenges, the youth who participate in BGCWC programs are resilient, curious, engaged, and determined to take advantage of the wide variety of programs and support the Club's offer to help overcome these obstacles. Boys & Girls Clubs of Weld County is committed to helping an underserved and overlooked population achieve academic success, improve their physical and mental health, and realize an overall higher quality of life. And when youth are provided the tools and opportunity to grow into self-sufficient, confident, and prepared adults, a more positive future is ensured for the community at large.

Keeping youth in school, engaged in activities that keep their brain and bodies strong and healthy, and exposing them to the arts and other creative outlets result not only in enduring change for the participants, but positively impacts a community’s economic, social, and civic health. Ensuring youth develop into mature, responsible adults results in, for example, lower incarceration rates, fewer unplanned pregnancies, and relying on emergency rooms for health care—and the high societal and economic costs that go with these options. When one invests in youth, the returns lead to a skilled workforce, increased productivity, and engaged and contributing citizens.

In 2019, club members surveyed stated:
• 99% of respondents expect to graduate from high school
• 87% are on grade level
• 93% of respondents make sure everyone in the group feels important when they are the group leader
• 86% of respondents feel they can stand up for what they think is right even if my friends disagree
• 96% of respondents try to help when they see people in need
• 84% of respondents believe they can make a difference in their community
• 90% of respondents feel that one of BGCWC’s adults believes they will be a success
• 92% of respondents enjoy coming to BGCWC

Financials

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2020 2019 990 2019 2018 2018 990 2014 FY 2014
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12.05

Average of 9.65 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.4

Average of 6.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26%

Average of 24% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$122,558 $278,231 $16,520 $87,746 $198,827
As % of expenses -6.3% 13.2% 0.7% 3.9% 9.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$329,733 $63,832 -$184,218 -$120,481 -$9,400
As % of expenses -15.3% 2.7% -7.6% -4.9% -0.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,703,191 $1,956,179 $1,874,899 $2,114,086 $2,366,889
Total revenue, % change over prior year -12.1% -27.6% -4.2% 12.8% 12.0%
Program services revenue 2.0% 2.7% 2.9% 0.3% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.6% 0.8% 2.2% 1.6% 3.1%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 14.2%
All other grants and contributions 97.2% 96.4% 95.0% 97.4% 82.3%
Other revenue 0.2% 0.0% 0.0% 0.6% 0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,943,395 $2,113,901 $2,213,053 $2,257,559 $2,141,029
Total expenses, % change over prior year 18.0% 8.8% 4.7% 2.0% -5.2%
Personnel 74.0% 72.2% 71.6% 73.2% 77.5%
Professional fees 0.9% 1.4% 1.8% 3.4% 1.0%
Occupancy 8.4% 8.2% 8.1% 8.6% 8.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 16.7% 18.2% 18.5% 14.7% 12.7%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,150,570 $2,328,300 $2,413,791 $2,465,786 $2,349,256
One month of savings $161,950 $176,158 $184,421 $188,130 $178,419
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $262,019 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,574,539 $2,504,458 $2,598,212 $2,653,916 $2,527,675

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Months of cash 12.8 10.3 8.4 6.6 8.4
Months of cash and investments 12.8 10.3 8.4 6.6 8.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 4.1 4.7 4.5 4.6 5.8
Balance sheet composition info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Cash $2,070,424 $1,808,049 $1,548,303 $1,234,987 $1,500,738
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $282,107 $303,196 $170,479 $270,412 $219,396
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $4,799,228 $4,909,165 $4,928,946 $4,947,694 $4,967,094
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 45.2% 48.6% 52.5% 55.9% 59.9%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 3.5% 4.4% 4.2% 3.6% 3.8%
Unrestricted net assets $3,285,779 $3,349,611 $3,165,393 $3,044,912 $3,035,512
Temporarily restricted net assets $1,526,463 $1,092,418 $739,736 N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,526,463 $1,092,418 $739,736 $508,517 $535,550
Total net assets $4,812,242 $4,442,029 $3,905,129 $3,553,429 $3,571,062

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Mr Terry Adams

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF WELD COUNTY INC

Board of directors
as of 03/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr. Jay Mendoza

Poudre Valley REA

Term: 2022 - 2023

Charlie Shoop

PFC

Loni Ferrier

Real Estate

Sally Warde

Wholesale Distribution

Tim Warde

Wholesale Distribution

Roch Schmitz - Treasurer

First National Bank

Jeff Wenaas

Hensel Phelps Construction

Tim Clancy

Flood & Peterson Insurance

Joaquin Gallegos

Great Western Bank

Matt Anderson

Ancon Constructors

Jamie Baessler

Baessler Homes

Stacie Datteri

Flood & Peterson

Sandy Helgeson

Community Volunteer

Jay Mendoza

Poudre Valley REA

Collin Richardson

Richmark Holdings

Michelle Scallon

Windsor High School

Sarah Wyscaver

Aims Community College

Brian Blehm

United Power

Lyndsey Crum

University of Northern Colorado

Julie Luekenga

Aims Community College

Robb Miller

Assistant DA - Weld County

Stacie Miller

Community Volunteer

Deirdre Pearson

Northern Colorado Health Alliance

Jesus Perez

JBS, USA

Marc Shirazi

Shirazi Benefits

Djenita Svinjar

Hensel Phelps

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/10/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data