PLATINUM2023

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Lincoln, MA   |  lovelane.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

EIN: 04-3139666


Mission

In a fun, supportive environment, Lovelane provides high-quality therapeutic horseback riding to achieve occupational, physical, speech, cognitive and other therapeutic gains, focusing on children with special needs.

Notes from the nonprofit

It has been noted that Lovelane's fundraising expenses increase dramatically every two years as does Lovelane's fundraising income creating an uneven cycle. The reason for this biennial swing is because a special event called the "Hoedown" is held every two years which brings in significant revenue that is budgeted to underwrite Lovelane's expenses over a two-year period. The income and expenses from this Hoedown however, appear on our financials only in the year of the Hoedown.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Wendy Bell

Main address

40 Baker Bridge Road

Lincoln, MA 01773 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

04-3139666

Subject area info

Animal therapy

Equestrianism

Developmental disability services

Population served info

Children and youth

People with disabilities

Chronically ill people

Terminally ill people

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our core lesson program serves 100 students weekly in private mounted therapeutic riding lessons, and 35 additional children join us for unmounted therapeutic mentoring programs. Lovelane’s therapeutic riding lessons focus on trunk control, balance, muscle tone, and strength, range of motion and joint mobility, fine motor coordination, sensory integration and concentration, spatial awareness and perceptual skills, cognitive skills, speech and language skills, self-discipline and self-awareness and confidence, pride, and self-esteem.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program

Lovelane is a pediatric, therapeutic horseback riding program that has a dramatic impact on the physical and cognitive development of children with special needs. Lovelane is recognized and regularly recommended by the Boston pediatric medical community for the treatment of a wide variety of special needs diagnoses. Lovelane serves students, ages 18 months to 22 years, from 39 communities with the help of 12 specially trained horses. Our core lesson program serves 100 students weekly in private mounted therapeutic riding lessons. Therapeutic riding lessons focus on trunk control, balance, muscle tone, and strength, range of motion and joint mobility, fine motor coordination, sensory integration and concentration, spatial awareness and perceptual skills, cognitive skills, speech and language skills, self-discipline and self-awareness and confidence, pride, and self-esteem.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities
Chronically ill people
Terminally ill people

In addition to the core program 40 children join us weekly in un-mounted therapeutic mentoring programs. This is a 12 week off-the-horse program where children, in a motivating and supportive environment, learn about horses and horse care.
Carrot Club: for our youngest students, ages 3 – 6, focused on social skills
Horse Care Academy: for teens and young adults, focused on horse care, building confidence and functional life skills
Find Your Stride: for young adults, focused on social skills, self-advocacy, independent living, and occupational skills
Spur Outstanding Leaders (SOL): for teens and young adults, focused on building leadership skills
Private Unmounted Sessions: for students of all ages, designed for their individual needs & goals

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Terminally ill people
Chronically ill people
People with disabilities

Lovelane offers summer workshops and partnerships with local non-profits such as The Cotting School, City to Saddle, The LABBB Group, Chapel Hill Chauncey Hall School and The Perkins School for the Blind.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities
Chronically ill people
Terminally ill people
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Strategy in Marketing Award 2015

Massachusetts Non Profit Network

Affiliations & memberships

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl.) 1992

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children taken off the waitlist and who join the program in a given fiscal year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Tracking to ascertain just how many children are taken off the waitlist in a given year.

Number of children registered for programming in a fiscal year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number reflects the total number of children enrolled in all of our programming in a given fiscal year.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of volunteers used in our program. Every other year, we will see a jump in the number of volunteers as we hold a biennial fundraiser and require additional assistance.

Number of children who return to the program after one year of enrollment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Children are enrolled by semesters--Fall, Spring and Summer. Our fiscal year is July 1 - June 30th. We are tracking how many children continue in the program after being enrolled for a year.

Average number of years a child stays in the program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Lovelane Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Turnover is low at our organization and we want to track how long a child stays in the program from year to year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide the highest quality, safest, one-on-one therapeutic lessons to each of our students. At the same time, we aim to improve each individual student’s quality of life by incorporating the joy of riding, the emotional impact of working with animals, the freedom of movement that is inherent in this activity and the well-documented physical/cognitive and emotional clinical success of therapeutic activities on horseback. Physical goals for our students include improved muscle tone and strength, increased balance, range of motion and mobility and sensory integration. Cognitive and emotional developmental goals include improved focus and concentration, improved speech and language skills, independence, confidence, social and emotional development. Lovelane has a waitlist of 295 students (December 2020), demonstrating both the need for this unique therapeutic approach and the value parents and physicians place in its outcomes. Once in our program, families re-enroll every semester, for an average of 10 years, allowing us to invest in the child’s growth, development, life interests and pursuits. Beyond the physical and cognitive advancements, Lovelane children experience a sense of accomplishment. Our students have siblings and friends who participate in dance, soccer or other community activities. At Lovelane, our students ride horses! In a world where they are often told they cannot, at Lovelane, they learn they can! Lovelane is committed to individual sessions for each child so that specific therapies can be analyzed and applied for progressive results. These therapies are altered as the children grow and goals change. Lovelane's therapeutic program currently includes sessions with children whose primary diagnoses include autism spectrum disorders (27%), genetic disorders (20%), cerebral palsy (16%), learning and developmental delays (15%), down syndrome (8%), neurological and seizure disorders (7%) rare or undiagnosed disabilities (6%) and hearing and vision impairments (1%). Most of our students spend months or years in clinical OT or PT settings before being introduced to Lovelane. Imagine the difference between asking an eight-year-old to do sit-ups on a mat in a clinic or instead, setting that child on a moving horse and even going to ride on a trail in the woods. The results of increased core strength, strength in hip flexors and legs and aerobic stamina for example, may be the same—but the path to success is most often happier and quicker on a horse. The rigor and discipline, required for progress, is replaced with fun in a unique and special environment. There is an emotional toll on families whose children do not want to go or who do not thrive in clinical settings. At Lovelane these families witness their children enjoying therapy sessions, while making huge therapeutic gains. These gains inspire more gains. Enjoyment is a powerful incentive.

Good Health and Well Being: Lovelane believes that therapeutic riding can have a dramatic impact on the physical and cognitive development of children with special needs through its holistic approach and unique supportive environment. Lovelane has had a successful and safe track record for over 30 years. Hiring exceptional instructors is key to carrying out well-planned, diagnosis-appropriate and safe lessons. Fully providing those instructors with a variety of well-trained horses, a top-notch, well maintained facility, access to therapeutic tools and games and opportunities for continuing education are top priorities to providing high quality lessons.

Reduced Inequalities: Many of our families are also facing the economic toll of the pandemic and have expressed a greater need for subsidy. Families of children with special needs typically face extreme financial pressures to provide all the tools and therapy needed to support their children’s well-being. According to the US Department of Agriculture, it costs about $240,000 to raise a child from birth to age 18, add special needs into the equation and the amount quadruples. It is imperative to raise funds to provide tuition assistance, in order to ensure services for all families who need financial help.

Weekly therapeutic sessions cost Lovelane $138 and are offered to families at a subsidized price of $104. In order to ensure equal provision of services to all families, Lovelane established a Tuition Assistance Program to provide financial assistance beyond the subsidized lesson price. Lovelane accepts children off our waitlist based on next availability no matter the family’s financial circumstance. Last year, prior to the pandemic, 42% percent of Lovelane families received at total of $65,000 in additional assistance. This fiscal year, (July 1, 2020-June 30, 2021) we expect to see a 7% - 12% increase in the need for financial assistance from our families.

But of growing concern is access to our program. Are families from disadvantaged communities being referred to us at the same rate as families from wealthier communities. Are families from minority communities aware of our program? Are these families aware of the benefits therapeutic riding can provide? How can we supply this information and how?

In the category of Good Health and Well Being, Lovelane certainly has developed effective programming and has a successful track-record of providing high quality therapeutic riding lessons. This is Lovelane's mission and we try not to pursue programming that does not support our mission and distract us from excellence.

In the category of Reduced Inequalities, Lovelane has always provided an inclusive environment for staff, board and in welcoming families and providing tuition assistance to those families in need. Energy will go beyond this in the coming years to elucidate if our services are accessible to those from minority and economically disadvantaged communities; find out at what rate our program is being recommended and to whom, specifically; find out what barriers exist for families receiving our services. And finally, as an organization accredited by the Professional Association of Horsemanship International, we have a duty to recruit members to our field from a variety of skills, backgrounds, cultures and identities. With this agency, Lovelane will participate to unlock the doors of access to the therapeutic horseback riding and equine assisted service industry. These are top priorites for management as our Executive Director believes in transparency across hiring practices, donations and financial management, registering children for our programs and in paying vendors for services and for creating an inclusive environment in the therapeutic riding field that accurately represents the community with which we live and serve.

In 1992, Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program was incorporated as a not-for-profit by an occupational therapist and is now an accredited member of the Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH, Intl.). Lovelane is recognized and regularly recommended by the Boston pediatric medical community for therapy for a wide variety of special needs diagnosis. A successful capital campaign in 2004 enabled the program to move into a permanent home designed specifically for the special needs population. The facility includes indoor and outdoor riding arenas, a family viewing room, a therapy consultation room, 12 horse stalls and access to multi-sensory-constructed, outdoor trails. The program more than tripled in sized with the new facility’s opening. Currently, Lovelane is open seven days a week providing 4500 therapeutic sessions a year with the help of 197 volunteers.

In 2016, Lovelane met its $5million goal with its Stanley Sabin Sustainability fund from which interest, if needed, can be used to offset program expenses. Additional funds have also been invested for the long-term to provide another resource for capital improvements and for the purchase of horses for the program. Additionally, a fund in honor of former student Susan McDaniel has been created to support tuition assistance. Currently tuition assistance is funded out of operating. Now Lovelane has the opportunity to use interest from the Susan McDaniel fund to not only take the pressure off of operating but will allow Lovelane to maintain or increase funding for families if needed during economic downturns. These efforts have all been a part of a long-term succession plan developed by the Executive Director and the Board of Directors to insure that Lovelane can still thrive thirty years from now.

Next steps include succession planning for members of the board. This is being done through the work of an active governance committee and a well-documented referral process, committee assignments and then on-boarding process for board member candidates.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14.10

Average of 14.55 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

9.3

Average of 8.4 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

17%

Average of 17% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $348,694 $941,424 $15,406 $1,733,361 -$809,697
As % of expenses 31.0% 83.4% 1.3% 150.5% -61.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $204,250 $796,844 -$133,274 $1,582,335 -$965,820
As % of expenses 16.1% 62.6% -9.8% 121.5% -65.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,263,702 $1,865,713 $1,463,468 $1,321,276 $1,902,873
Total revenue, % change over prior year -28.2% 47.6% -21.6% -9.7% 44.0%
Program services revenue 43.3% 29.4% 24.1% 36.0% 29.7%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 9.7% 7.0% 11.0% 9.0% 12.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.7%
All other grants and contributions 35.9% 60.7% 51.9% 48.9% 40.5%
Other revenue 11.1% 2.9% 12.9% 6.1% 16.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,125,151 $1,129,210 $1,209,023 $1,151,804 $1,318,434
Total expenses, % change over prior year 8.7% 0.4% 7.1% -4.7% 14.5%
Personnel 68.0% 66.0% 71.3% 66.6% 62.6%
Professional fees 4.1% 4.3% 4.3% 4.9% 5.4%
Occupancy 3.5% 4.1% 3.8% 4.6% 4.5%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 5.0% 5.4% 3.5% 4.6% 3.2%
All other expenses 19.5% 20.1% 17.1% 19.3% 24.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,269,595 $1,273,790 $1,357,703 $1,302,830 $1,474,557
One month of savings $93,763 $94,101 $100,752 $95,984 $109,870
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,363,358 $1,367,891 $1,458,455 $1,398,814 $1,584,427

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 10.4 7.4 8.9 9.0 9.3
Months of cash and investments 68.4 75.1 72.8 93.1 74.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 60.0 69.4 64.7 85.5 67.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $972,760 $698,583 $895,723 $862,914 $1,019,704
Investments $5,442,532 $6,366,480 $6,439,379 $8,069,304 $7,125,211
Receivables $65,689 $59,874 $598 $23,775 $30,173
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $4,170,169 $4,200,900 $4,232,336 $4,270,731 $4,300,280
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 41.3% 44.3% 47.5% 50.6% 53.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 5.6% 2.3% 5.4% 4.3% 5.4%
Unrestricted net assets $8,074,472 $8,871,316 $8,738,042 $10,320,377 $9,354,557
Temporarily restricted net assets $59,500 $30,000 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $387,260 $387,260 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $446,760 $417,260 $409,321 $389,064 $387,260
Total net assets $8,521,232 $9,288,576 $9,147,363 $10,709,441 $9,741,817

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Wendy Bell

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Lovelane Special Needs Horseback Riding Program Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mr William “Wil” H. Catlin Jr.

Boston Realty Advisors

Term: 2020 - 2024

Debby Sabin

Founding Director, Lovelane

John Downing

RDC Capital Partners

Mark Julien

Kronos

Wil Catlin

Real Estate

Kathleen Collins

MSPCA

Ashton Jones

Investments

Paul Raymond

Attorney

Abby Hemani

Fidelity

Sean O'Brien

Hellman & Friedman

Lisa Bendixen

ICF

Helene Powers

Community Leader

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/14/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
There are no contractors recorded for this organization.

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser