PLATINUM2024

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Great Falls, MT   |  www.eaglemount.net
GuideStar Charity Check

Eagle Mount Great Falls

EIN: 81-0498964


Mission

The mission of Eagle Mount Great Falls is to provide therapeutic and recreational activities for children and adults with physical, developmental, behavioral and/or mental challenges, striving to improve the quality of life for them and their families. We serve Great Falls, MT and the surrounding communities. Businesses and individuals provide their support through the use of their facilities, equipment and donations. Eagle Mount Great Falls is truly blessed by local support!

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Deb Sivumaki

Operations Director

Heather Martin

Main address

1065 Franklin Ave P.O. Box 2866

Great Falls, MT 59405 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

81-0498964

Subject area info

Sports and recreation

Community recreation

Human services

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

People with disabilities

People with diseases and illnesses

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Other Recreation, Sports, or Leisure Activities N.E.C. (N99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Eagle Mount Great Falls strives to find the ability in disability. We use adaptive equipment and lesson plans in order to provide safe recreation for a variety of disabilities based on each individuals ability, not their disability. We also work on inclusion - teaching abled bodied individuals that they can play and socialize along side those with a disability.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Tippy Toes

“Movement, Music & Play. Creative movement for children of all abilities.”
Creative movement is a joyful way for children of all abilities to explore movement through music and to help develop physical and emotional skills while using their bodies. Through movement, children learn about their bodies, space around them, and each other. All children can benefit from creative movement because they can participate at their own level and ability.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Infants and toddlers

"Horses change lives. They give people confidence, hope, self-esteem and provide peace and tranquility to troubled souls.”
The Eagle Mount Equestrian Center promotes safety and optimal outcomes in equine-assisted activities for individuals and families with special needs.

Equine-Assisted Activities such as Therapeutic Riding and Equine Assisted Learning are available for:
Individual or group sessions.
Mounted or unmounted sessions.
Special groups.
Our traveling horses: Group, nursing, and retirement homes; Schools and other interested groups.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

“Mountains accommodate everyone equally. Gravity doesn’t care if you are sitting down or standing up!”
The Ski & Board Program provides the opportunity for individuals of all abilities to enjoy the sport of skiing and snowboarding. Through this program, participants gain the ability to develop different muscles, improve their balance and coordination, increase their self-awareness and confidence, and improve their self-esteem.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

“Get Really Excited About Today!”
Fun and play provide opportunities to make friends, share experiences, discover abilities and uncover talents. Positive social interaction, Independence, and potential for increased self-esteem.adults with special needs.  We help them develop the confidence, awareness, and insight that allow them to draw on their experiences.

Camp GREAT has many great benefits and our participants express their excitement to return next summer...
Positive social interaction, Independence, Potential for increased self-esteem and so much more!

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

“Put Your Disability on Ice”
Sled hockey is played by a wide range of players with a variety of mobility limitations: amputees, spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, along with anyone who has a disability that limits participation in stand up hockey.
Sled hockey is played like traditional stand up hockey except the players sit in a specially designed bucket seat attached to a lightweight frame with hockey skate blades underneath and propel through the ice with two adaptive hockey sticks.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Pontoon & Rafting
Friday Night Out and Prom
Bowling

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2023 was an amazing year for us and we can't wait to see even more growth in 2024. 445 individuals served through 12 different adaptive activities!

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These our the number of hours our volunteers gave to our programs.

Number of programs documented

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals each year is to raise enough money to support our activities and to grow along with our community. Growing can mean developing new programming and changing old programming to accommodate the population in which we serve.

Stratigies in raising enough money are always hard. We strive to seek out new donors, grants and find other fundraising opportunities that best fit our community and our participants. In order to offer the best programming we evaluate our activities, participant attendance and program evaluations every year to determine what the greatest community need is.

We have an amazing staff and many volunteers that dives into all areas of our organization and work as a team to make things happen. We can't do this by ourselves and we rely heavily on our community to keep things rolling.

We started with 2 programs and over the last 30 years have implemented over 12 different activities for individuals with disabilities with a small staff of up to 10 employees. Utilizing a lot of volunteers each year we try to accomplish giving our targeted population the recreation they need and seek and we are successful as we try different activities to accommodate the need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Eagle Mount Great Falls
Fiscal year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.90

Average of 2.01 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

12.9

Average of 3.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

10%

Average of 14% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Oct 01 - Sep 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Eagle Mount Great Falls’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$3,446 -$70,677 $94,097 $195,187 $233,762
As % of expenses -0.6% -13.7% 25.6% 68.7% 70.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$28,118 -$92,422 $75,673 $178,090 $217,434
As % of expenses -5.0% -17.2% 19.6% 59.1% 62.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $549,603 $403,552 $446,261 $354,305 $903,757
Total revenue, % change over prior year 12.4% -26.6% 10.6% -20.6% 155.1%
Program services revenue 12.7% 10.2% 3.1% 1.1% 1.9%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 5.0% 8.7% 6.0% 6.8% 3.4%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 13.5% 19.3% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 75.7% 71.2% 68.9% 55.9% 80.0%
Other revenue 6.6% 9.8% 8.5% 17.0% 14.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $537,676 $514,521 $368,232 $284,271 $331,438
Total expenses, % change over prior year 11.0% -4.3% -28.4% -22.8% 16.6%
Personnel 64.9% 67.6% 67.2% 72.0% 74.0%
Professional fees 2.3% 2.4% 0.7% 1.0% 1.0%
Occupancy 3.0% 2.3% 3.0% 5.3% 4.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 29.9% 27.7% 29.1% 21.7% 20.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $562,348 $536,266 $386,656 $301,368 $347,766
One month of savings $44,806 $42,877 $30,686 $23,689 $27,620
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $28,939 $150,000
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $607,154 $579,143 $417,342 $353,996 $525,386

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.9 0.1 6.8 10.1 12.9
Months of cash and investments 29.6 29.3 48.5 69.9 62.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 24.5 23.8 39.2 58.3 55.5
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $39,697 $5,976 $208,969 $238,473 $355,378
Investments $1,284,610 $1,249,078 $1,279,389 $1,417,058 $1,377,547
Receivables $4,638 $3,717 $7,899 $6,302 $7,050
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $585,510 $588,935 $588,935 $568,314 $575,614
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 79.0% 82.3% 85.4% 87.1% 88.8%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.4% 5.3% 13.7% 11.1% 2.5%
Unrestricted net assets $1,219,072 $1,126,650 $1,202,323 $1,380,413 $1,597,847
Temporarily restricted net assets $30,138 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $166,954 $167,463 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $197,092 $167,463 $163,720 $162,102 $160,485
Total net assets $1,416,164 $1,294,112 $1,366,042 $1,542,515 $1,758,332

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Deb Sivumaki

Debbie came to Eagle Mount in May of 2000. Deb oversees all it's functions. She has an extensive background in television advertising, marketing, public relations and public speaking. Deb has served on the board of directors of the Great Falls Advertising Federation since 1998 and was named the 2001/02 President of this organization. She has also been active with the Chamber of Commerce and served on the Agriculture committee. Her exemplary community service also includes serving as the President of the Miss Rodeo Montana advisory board from 1998-2001. Through Deb's many contacts, public speaking engagements to area businesses and organizations within the Great Falls area, she is working on establishing partnerships with Eagle Mount and local businesses as well as creating a better community awareness of what Eagle Mount programs provide for people with disabilities.

Operations Director

Heather Martin

Born and raised in Great Falls, MT and with a background as a Certified Medical Assistant, Heather joined the Eagle Mount Great Falls team in July of 1994. Since then she has expanded her role into Operations Director which involves all operating and programming areas of Eagle Mount Great Falls – running and developing programs, fundraising, accounting, participant and volunteer recruitment and management, human resources, community outreach, as well as maintaining the daily operations.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Eagle Mount Great Falls

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Jim Senst

Retired

Term: 2020 -


Board co-chair

Sarah Goldsmith

Dave Grubich

Diana Ruddy

Patrick Winderl

Kyle Grossman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable