PLATINUM2024

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

aka AWS   |   West Kennebunk, ME   |  animalwelfaresociety.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

EIN: 23-7018176


Mission

Animal Welfare Society exists to serve as the safety net for lost and homeless pets and to provide access to affordable services and resources necessary for long term well-being, so pets and their families stay together and thrive.

Ruling year info

1969

Executive Director

Ms. Abigail Smith

Main address

PO Box 43

West Kennebunk, ME 04094 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7018176

Subject area info

Animal welfare

Animal training

Veterinary medicine

Human-animal interactions

Population served info

Children and youth

Adults

Families

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1967, the Animal Welfare Society (AWS) has played a crucial role in bringing pets and families together. In an average year, thousands of homeless and stray pets find Fear-Free, comfortable and humane care in our Adoption Center, ultimately going home with new families. But our job and our mission doesn't stop there. We don't just make families; we keep them together. We strive to provide the resources needed so pets and their families stay together, despite financial setbacks or limitations. Keeping pets at home - where they are loved - is the cornerstone of our mission. Programs and services include discounted fees for veterinary care to make care accessible and affordable to all, temporary pet boarding in times of hardship, food & supplies provided to the community, behavioral training resources and more.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption

In the Adoption Center, we pair families or individuals desiring a companion animal with pets in need of a home. Companion animals we care for at the shelter include dogs, cats, rabbits, birds, gerbils, mice, hamsters, guinea pigs and other small animals.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Cleo Fund supports pet-owning Mainers who lack affordable or accessible veterinary care in their communities by providing financial resources and bringing veterinary providers to rural, underserved areas (called "veterinary deserts").

The program primarily supports income-qualified individuals who want have their pet dog or pet cat spayed or neutered, thus eliminating unexpected litters, which can be a financial challenge for many families and increase pet populations (and lead to overcrowding) in small rural animal shelters.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

We provide canine training classes to dog owners in our community. Classes range from Puppy Kindergarten to advanced agility courses. We also provide one-on-one consultations, behavioral assistance, and drop in social hours for dogs and their families. Our training team also works extensively with resident (shelter) dogs to keep them active and enriched while at AWS. With the knowledge and training we offer resident pets, we can provide counseling to interested adopters, with the hope of placing the dog in a home with a household and lifestyle that fits it best.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Community Veterinary Clinic is a full-service, high-quality practice serving resident (shelter) pets and pets of community members. With a two-tiered pricing system, veterinary care is affordable to all, by offering reduced pricing for those who are income-qualified. The goal is to help owners keep the pet at home, rather than them having to make the heart-wrenching decision to surrender it to the shelter when limited financial resources prohibit needed emergency or preventative veterinary care. The clinic serves clients in Maine and New Hampshire. From time to time, the clinic veterinarians also offer vaccination clinics in the community.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

The Pets and Survivors to Safety (PASS) program operates in partnership with Caring Unlimited, York County’s domestic violence resource. If a pet owner seeks services from Caring Unlimited, their pet can be passed into the care of AWS temporarily, allowing the owner greater peace of mind to focus on securing their own safety and wellbeing.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people

Through PAWS Across America, the Animal Welfare Society receives adoptable companion animals from other shelters and rescue groups in need of help placing their animals. In many parts of the country, particularly in the South and Caribbean, there are far more animals in shelters than are adopted to the local population. This leaves local shelters with the unfortunate decision to have to put highly adoptable, healthy pets to sleep. PAWS Across America helps save these animals’ lives. Working with other non-profits, including rescue and transport groups, AWS brings these animals to Maine. Transporting animals from low demand locales to high demand locales is an extraordinary collaborative effort of the entire animal welfare community. We are honored to play a part in saving the lives of thousands of pets each year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

AWS Youth Programs, led by a state-certified educator, provide interactive humane education lessons for children of all ages, both in the AWS Youth Programs Classroom and out in classrooms, libraries and school assemblies in our community. Our unique and engaging learning opportunities targets three important educational components: literacy, social-emotional learning and animal advocacy.

Humane education lessons incorporate companion animals to help children grow emotionally, socially, culturally and academically. Students who participate in AWS Youth Programs are more engaged in their community, more compassionate towards those around them, and more knowledgeable about animals and the world we share.

Specialty programs, often held in local classrooms or at school assemblies, support social-emotional learning curriculum in several area public schools.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students
At-risk youth

AWS' Stay@Home program is a suite of services available to qualified community members, including older adults and veterans, who need temporary support caring for their pets during times of unplanned financial hardship such as housing instability or displacement (eviction, house fire, etc), medical emergencies or unemployment. The program provides training resources, food, veterinary services, temporary boarding and other support as needed, with the ultimate goal of keeping the pet and its family together.


Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Veterans
Retired people

As a community animal resource, we support community members who seek to rehome their pet. By providing resources, such as behavior training, veterinary care, or food and supplies, can help a pet family make their home and lifestyle a better fit for their pet before the family considers giving up their pet.

If other re-homing resources aren't a solution, we offer animal admissions, where a pet owner surrenders their pet to AWS. After assessing the animal - providing all care needs - the pet goes up for adoption and finds a new home.

We also support families with unexpected litters though the Mother Spay Program. Once the litter is 8-10 weeks old, AWS spays the mother at no cost to the family and she goes right back home with her people. The kittens or puppies go through the animal admissions and adoption processes, quickly finding new homes.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Retired people
Unemployed people
Veterans

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Charity Navigator - highest ranking 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Cleo Fund (Spay/Neuter)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children reached by Humane Education programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Youth Humane Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020: Stay at Home orders and school closures due to the pandemic led to many virtual learning opportunities.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Canine Training & Behavior Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020: With Stay at Home orders due to the pandemic and social distancing, most group classes were not held. The training team provided extensive virtual content, reaching more than 2,400 families.

Number of medical exams and procedures provided by veterinarians (excluding spay/neuter surgeries)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Veterinary Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2020: Despite a 3 month shutdown to non-essential services due to the pandemic, the Clinic saw more pets and provided more services than ever before.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2020-2022: The pandemic has reduced the number of animals arriving from the south. Additionally, families have found more time to train their pets, thus reducing requests for rehoming.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Stay@Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of pet families served through the Stay@Home program, including temporary boarding, veterinary care, educational or training resources, food and supplies, etc.

Total pounds of pet food and litter distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Stay@Home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Animal Welfare Society seeks to aid companion animals in need by offering intake services for pets in 18 local municipalities and operating a progressive Adoption Center to find these pets loving new homes. Additionally, AWS works with out-of-state rescue groups needing assistance placing their animals. The goal is to bring together pets and families though successful adoptions and reunions (for lost & found pets brought in by animal control officers).

In addition, AWS seeks to keep beloved family pets and their families together, despite temporarily financial setbacks or limitations. Despite the best of intentions, things can happen, and circumstances can change, impacting family members and their pets. We know this today more than ever with the pandemic, high inflation and housing affordability surfacing in the past few years. Budgets remain limited as the cost of living rises. For example, if a pet were to have an accident or an illness, many families would be challenged to provide veterinary care because it is so expensive. And in that case, the options are disheartening: either the pet goes untreated and suffers, the pet is humanely euthanized because the treatment is too expensive, or the pet is surrendered over to a shelter who agrees to pay for the treatment and re-home the pet. Pets are members of the family. As an animal welfare organization, we see every day how important pets are to peoples wellbeing and health mentally, socially and physical. The health benefits of having a pet are well documented in scientific studies and in anecdotal reports from the pandemic. Thus, we want to provide as many resources as we can to keep pets and their beloved family together.

Thus our Stay@Home program. Stay@Home is a suite of services available to qualified community members who need temporary support caring for their pets. Resources include behavior and training consultations, pet food and supplies, affordable veterinary services through the AWS Community Veterinary Clinic, temporary boarding in our animal shelter and other support as needed.

Through all AWS' programs and services, we support more than 10,000 pets and pet families in our community every year.

AWS, an animal resource for pets and their people, offers:

-Adoption, bringing homeless animals and people together. Each pet is spayed/neutered, vaccinated, microchipped and examined for health.
-Pets and Survivors to Safety, offering pet care for victims of violence fleeing a dangerous situation.
-Transport Program (Paws Across America), bringing highly adoptable pets from overcrowded, under resourced shelters in other parts of the country/world to Maine for adoption.
-Youth Humane Education, teaching animal care and empathy in AWS youth classroom and schools.
-Canine Training classes by a professional staff. Group classes for dogs of all ages, breeds and abilities are taught by professional dog trainers, along with in-home private consults and one-on-one work.
-Spay/Neuter resources, offering vouchers and multi-day clinics, reaching the most underserved.
-In-house, full-service Community Veterinary Clinic serving pet owners in need with reduced fee care, ensuring that pet owners do not lose a pet due to veterinary expenses.
-Re-Homing Services, including working together to find resources for individuals needing behavioral, medical or other services to keep their animal at homes, spay/neuter services for unwanted litters, temporary boarding and animal admissions for pet owners who cannot keep their pet for any reason.
-Stay@Home, providing resources to maintain pet ownership and care, particularly for those facing financial hardship or housing insecurity. Resources include temporarily boarding, pet food pantry, complimentary veterinary care, training lessons and other supplies.

Through fifty years of innovation, work, and problem solving, AWS is well-equipped to meet the todays animal welfare demands. Our team is composed of more than 40 professionals, including veterinarians, licensed veterinary technicians, animal care staff, canine behavior staff, education staff, and administrative support staff.

Our work is at a leadership level across the state and the region, and our community of supporters is enthusiastic about our next steps in meeting our mission and serving our community's animal welfare needs.

In January 2018, AWS completed the first phase of a full campus renovation project. With community support, a 5,000 sq. ft. addition and a 9,000 sq. ft. renovation expanded the current in-house spay/neuter clinic to become a full-service Community Veterinary Clinic. The Clinic serves income-qualified pet owners by providing emergency and wellness care they otherwise would be unable to afford. A new canine training room, adoption lobby, and staff spaces rounded out the project. In its first full year, the Clinic saw more than 10,000 patients - providing thousands of surgeries and life-saving procedures, vaccinations and wellness exams.

IN 2019-2020, a remodel of the animal spaces took place. Cat kennels doubled in size, windows were added to the spaces and our cat community rooms received a full face-lift, complete with climbing apparatus. Our dog spaces saw the kennel chain link replaced by tempered glass and stainless steel. Kennel block were repaired, and the kennel floors were upgraded with a sealed epoxy. All animal spaces received streams of natural light and sound mitigating features.

In 2020 and 2021, despite the pandemic, AWS remained open for animal admissions, adoptions and veterinary care, though at a reduced capacity, based on state and federal guidelines and staffing. In 2021, AWS increased its community programs to work with more families in need of assistance to keep their pets happy and at home by formally launching the Stay@Home program, including the in-house pet food pantry.

The Board of Directors in early 2022 approved a new mission statement to better reflect AWS' approach to meeting the needs of the community's animals - and the people who love them.

2023 saw the growth of the Stay@Home program with twice as many people reaching out for resources, particularly temporary boarding. Additionally, the foster program was expanded, with record numbers of pets staying in foster care while awaiting adoption or during their temporary boarding. Finally, in addition to the aforementioned community initiatives, AWS held its 4th annual Woofstock Festival, a free family-friendly and dog-friendly event, held on a summer afternoon on AWS' grounds which brought thousands of community members to our facility, many for the first time. By increasing our community's knowledge of our organization (AWS is much more than "just" an animal shelter), we can better serve the pets and community members who need us most, thus creating a happier and healthier community for all pets and people.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.)

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

21.24

Average of 15.19 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.5

Average of 1.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

17%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$52,501 -$337,199 $1,312,404 $940,466 -$339,315
As % of expenses -1.7% -11.0% 44.5% 35.8% -11.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$240,151 -$590,614 $1,065,282 $713,006 -$550,082
As % of expenses -7.5% -17.7% 33.3% 25.0% -17.0%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,439,127 $2,887,266 $4,322,280 $2,891,052 $3,248,197
Total revenue, % change over prior year 6.6% -16.0% 49.7% -33.1% 12.4%
Program services revenue 32.0% 45.4% 33.4% 56.8% 51.4%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.6% 1.3% 0.9% 1.3% 2.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 15.6% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 39.1% 41.5% 62.6% 27.5% 47.0%
Other revenue 27.3% 11.8% 3.1% -1.2% -0.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,034,469 $3,078,460 $2,949,818 $2,626,493 $3,030,367
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.9% 1.4% -4.2% -11.0% 15.4%
Personnel 69.2% 69.8% 71.4% 75.5% 73.4%
Professional fees 0.5% 0.4% 1.5% 0.6% 0.5%
Occupancy 1.6% 2.1% 1.9% 1.9% 1.9%
Interest 0.2% 0.2% 0.3% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 28.5% 27.5% 24.9% 21.9% 24.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,222,119 $3,331,875 $3,196,940 $2,853,953 $3,241,134
One month of savings $252,872 $256,538 $245,818 $218,874 $252,531
Debt principal payment $0 $64,500 $0 $451,400 $0
Fixed asset additions $1,776,851 $308,236 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $5,251,842 $3,961,149 $3,442,758 $3,524,227 $3,493,665

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.4 0.7 1.8 1.4 1.5
Months of cash and investments 11.4 9.0 9.0 16.4 14.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 6.2 3.4 7.8 13.0 9.9
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $599,915 $190,916 $452,024 $315,275 $386,354
Investments $2,280,990 $2,120,496 $1,760,270 $3,276,890 $3,155,986
Receivables $83,533 $56,164 $8,915 $11,142 $39,251
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $5,456,720 $5,743,165 $5,862,770 $5,866,059 $5,806,458
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 28.5% 31.1% 34.7% 38.2% 41.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 6.1% 6.1% 8.4% 2.1% 2.2%
Unrestricted net assets $5,279,127 $4,688,513 $5,753,795 $6,466,801 $5,916,719
Temporarily restricted net assets $143,438 $157,266 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $1,400,059 $1,396,604 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $1,543,497 $1,553,870 $1,578,137 $1,577,409 $1,497,358
Total net assets $6,822,624 $6,242,383 $7,331,932 $8,044,210 $7,414,077

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Ms. Abigail Smith

Abigail Smith began serving as the Executive Director of the Animal Welfare Society in Kennebunk, Maine in 2015. Since her arrival, AWS has expanded its facilities and programming to include the AWS Community Veterinary Clinic, extensive Behavior and Training programs, Humane Education outreach to traditional and underserved youth audiences and a sharp focus on community service. Prior to moving back to New England, she served as the Chief Animal Services Officer for the City of Austin, Texas after her time as Executive Director of the Tompkins County SPCA in Ithaca, New York. Abigail has more than fifteen years in Animal Welfare and currently serves as the Northeast Regional Representative for The Association of Animal Welfare Advancement and on the boards of directors of the Maine and New England Federations of Humane Societies.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY INC

Board of directors
as of 01/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ron Schneider

Bernstein Shur

Term: 2025 - 2022

Katie Graczyk

Bigelow & Co.

John Cavaretta

Village Food Market

Kathy Hughes

Robin Cyr

Albin, Randall & Bennett

Mike Ouellet

Ouellet Construction

Sam Bishop

Pace Consulting

Cindy Talbot

Dan Viehmann

Dan Viehmann Landscaping & Property Management

Sean Miller

Rarebreed Veterinary Partners

Jennifer Breton

Lebel & Harriman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Contractors

Fiscal year ending

Professional fundraisers

Fiscal year ending

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 Schedule G

Solicitation activities
Gross receipts from fundraising
Retained by organization
Paid to fundraiser