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United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Live United

aka United Way of Jackson County   |   Medford, OR   |  https://unitedwayofjacksoncounty.org

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GuideStar Charity Check

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

EIN: 93-0576632


Mission

Our mission: Mobilize caring to affect change. At its core, United Way of Jackson County believes people are connected and interdependent. When we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all. We all win when children form healthy attachments through a loving family, when they succeed in school, graduate and make successful transitions to adult responsibilities. We all win when families are financially stable, when people have good health, when people have a place to live, and when people are engaged and connected. We all win when people have access to transportation to pursue education, access to medical services and work. Through our role as convenor, facilitator and advocate, our goal is to create long lasting change by addressing the underlying causes of problems.

Ruling year info

1998

CEO/Executive Director

Ms. Dee Anne Everson

Main address

60 Hawthorne St.

Medford, OR 97504 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

United Good Neighbors of Jackson County

EIN

93-0576632

Subject area info

Education

Health care access

Mental health care

Public transportation

Community service

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Children and youth

Seniors

Women and girls

Economically disadvantaged people

At-risk youth

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (T01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

At its core, United Way of Jackson County believes people are connected and interdependent. When we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all. We all win when children form healthy attachments through a loving family, when they succeed in school, graduate and make successful transitions to adult responsibilities. We all win when families are financially stable, when people have good health, and when people are engaged and connected. We all win when people have transportation to pursue education, access to medical services and work. Through our role as convener, facilitator and advocate, our goal is to create long-lasting change by addressing the underlying causes of problems. This belief forms the foundation for our strategies for education, income, health and transportation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Idea Next

Big Idea Next focuses on students enrolled in alternative programs and schools throughout Jackson County. We publish Alternative Times magazine with student-led content, have a job shadowing program, and lead barrier busting efforts to motivate, inspire and cajole students to high school completion.

Population(s) Served
Students
At-risk youth

In This Together is a multi-year suicide prevention campaign targeting the residents of Southern Oregon and Northern California. KOBI-TV/NBC5 and United Way of Jackson County, along with our community partners, will use broadcast, web and social media to focus on mental wellness and suicide prevention.

In This Together seeks to break down the stigma and reports on suicide in a safe way. Safe doesn’t mean censoring things. It just means that the person’s suicidal thoughts or actions should not be romanticized, shamed, or exploited. Our mission: To offer a steady hand, guiding those in need to the light of hope. We intend to ensure that everyone knows there is ALWAYS someone to talk to.

In 2022, the project was honored to receive a NW Regional Emmy Award for Community Outreach and an NAB Foundation Service to America Award.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of media partnerships developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

In This Together

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

In This Together is a multi-year suicide prevention campaign partnership between KOBI-TV/NBC5 and UWJC.

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

United Way’s goal in education is increasing high school completion for students in alternative education programs. Our income goal is to increase financial stability for families and individuals by assisting with tax preparation and use of existing tax credits and by offering emergency assistance for those in need through Hope Chest, our community emergency fund. Our health goal is to maximize wellness in our community. Our transportation goal is to reduce barriers to transportation for low income, people with disabilities and aging populations.

Our education program, the Big Idea Next, links and leverages all existing services to encourage, cajole, motivate students in alternative education programs to complete high school. We have had remarkable success partnering with education, business, nonprofits and individuals to create change for the lives of these students and their families. Graduation rates are increasing dramatically. We partner with Oregon Health Sciences University at Southern Oregon University to provide student nurses to do a health risk assessment survey each year to collect data year on drop out risk, safety at school and in the home, mental health status and other self-reported issues.

Our income strategy is to promote financial stability and advance economic opportunity for low-income taxpayers and families through the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) program and with Hope Chest, our emergency assistance program. We operate a VITA site which has returned more than $3.5 million to our valley in Earned Income, Child Care and Education tax credits. Our emergency assistance fund - Hope Chest - helps families in dire situations with up to $1000 per year with rent, utilities, car repairs, mental health therapy, etc.

Our health strategy is to maximize wellness with our partner organizations by focusing on reducing child abuse, providing drug and alcohol treatment and preventing suicide. We have great success with public service campaigns that work to improve lives and change discourse on social issues in our community, most notably suicide prevention with our "In This Together" campaign.

Our transportation strategy is to reduce barriers to transportation for aging populations, people with disabilities and people with low income. We partner with our local transit district and paratransit to provide reduced rates, and opportunities for these populations.

Our staff is structured to both deliver services and engage deeply in community collaborations to deliver on our mission to mobilize caring to affect change. We have an office manager, an accounting specialist, two community impact directors (including one who provides interpreter/translator services), a lead community impact director, a campaign/new media director, a chief financial officer and CEO/executive director. We are active in funding over 25 programs and 17 strategic partnerships focused on the building blocks of a good life. Our organization is 66 years old and has a strong reputation throughout the community. We have eight staff and 32 board members, along with 1,500 volunteers, serving on committees and councils addressing issues from public policy and DEI to our annual giving campaign and annual Day of Caring volunteer service events.

United Way of Jackson County has had many accomplishments over the years. We are the only United Way in the country to have won an Emmy Award for our public service campaign on child abuse awareness. In 2019, we purchased, remodeled, moved in and completed our first ever capitol campaign in less than seven months to purchase our first permanent home. We received an award from IRS for running an unfunded VITA site in partnership with another nonprofit and a for profit corporation. While awards and recognition are great, the work is what matters. We moved the needle on graduation up from 61% when we started the Big Idea to having nearly 90% on track to graduate in the 2020 co-hort. We have built upon that success with the Big Idea Next, providing alternative education students with the tools, support and personal empowerment to graduate. We have increased awareness and reporting on child abuse through our prevention campaign. We have changed the discourse and reduced the stigma on mental illness with our anti-stigma efforts and had one of the most popular social media campaigns in Oregon’s history with our Shatter The Silence suicide awareness campaign. Our current suicide prevention program, In This Together, continues upon that success and reaches well over 1,000,000 people in the region and received both a regional Emmy award and NAB Service to America award in 2022. Our goal is connect people who need help with people who can help. And we remain focused on delivering on our mission of mobilizing caring to affect change.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2022 2023-0630 United Way of Jackson County FS 2021 A-133 Single Audit
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

28.57

Average of 9.49 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.1

Average of 3.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23%

Average of 27% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of United Way of Jackson County, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $16,177 -$821 $297,072 $137,300 $469,425
As % of expenses 1.6% -0.1% 6.4% 4.1% 22.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $2,357 -$17,348 $279,652 $118,983 $445,157
As % of expenses 0.2% -1.2% 6.0% 3.6% 21.1%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,092,022 $1,496,954 $6,599,632 $2,280,996 $2,745,083
Total revenue, % change over prior year -21.1% 37.1% 340.9% -65.4% 20.3%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.6% 1.1% 0.5% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 32.0% 11.0% 11.7%
All other grants and contributions 98.3% 98.7% 66.8% 90.3% 85.9%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.3% 0.7% -1.3% 2.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,036,780 $1,472,263 $4,638,844 $3,330,282 $2,090,041
Total expenses, % change over prior year 3.0% 42.0% 215.1% -28.2% -37.2%
Personnel 50.2% 35.7% 11.2% 18.1% 34.1%
Professional fees 2.8% 2.3% 1.3% 0.9% 1.7%
Occupancy 2.0% 1.3% 0.2% 0.3% 0.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 21.7% 15.1% 75.2% 6.7% 10.5%
All other expenses 23.3% 45.6% 12.2% 74.1% 53.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,050,600 $1,488,790 $4,656,264 $3,348,599 $2,114,309
One month of savings $86,398 $122,689 $386,570 $277,524 $174,170
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $108,432 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $61,139 $0 $28,299 $0 $546,372
Total full costs (estimated) $1,198,137 $1,611,479 $5,179,565 $3,626,123 $2,834,851

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 2.7 3.4 5.9 4.3 6.1
Months of cash and investments 2.7 3.4 5.9 4.3 6.1
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.7 1.8 1.3 2.3 3.2
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $236,922 $419,931 $2,279,451 $1,200,067 $1,063,751
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $285,372 $211,367 $135,235 $144,579 $370,471
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $413,799 $419,733 $448,032 $448,962 $995,334
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 9.2% 13.0% 16.1% 20.2% 11.5%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 6.9% 13.3% 2.3% 2.1% 1.3%
Unrestricted net assets $606,690 $589,342 $868,994 $987,977 $1,433,134
Temporarily restricted net assets $276,997 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $345,979 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $622,976 $635,097 $2,327,518 $1,116,210 $1,307,602
Total net assets $1,229,666 $1,224,439 $3,196,512 $2,104,187 $2,740,736

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO/Executive Director

Ms. Dee Anne Everson

Dee Anne Everson is the CEO/ED of United Way of Jackson County, having been appointed in 1997. Under her leadership, United Way launched the Day of Caring, WiLL (Women Living Leadership), the Meth Task Force, CAN (Child Abuse Network), the BIG IDEA, the BIG IDEA Next (high school completion for Alt Ed students), and In This Together, a suicide prevention campaign. She is past president of the Assoc. of United Ways of Oregon and is a graduate of Stanford University’s Nonprofit Leaders Program. Dee Anne serves on the Board of Directors for the Oregon Community Foundation, United Ways of the Pacific Northwest, as well as numerous other committees and boards including the Jackson Co. Juvenile Justice Committee and Jackson Co. Threat Assessment. Dee Anne spent 13 years in the corporate financial sector before starting her nonprofit career as the economist at the Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

United Way of Jackson County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Becky Snyder

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/25/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.