PLATINUM2024

Open Field

Play. Lead. Inspire

Pittsburgh, PA   |  www.openfieldintl.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Open Field

EIN: 27-4829728


Mission

Our mission is to improve the lives and futures of youth through sport.

Ruling year info

2012

Founder and CEO

Justin Forzano

Main address

6401 Penn Ave Suite 300

Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Cameroon Football Development Program

EIN

27-4829728

Subject area info

Leadership development

Youth mentoring

Youth organizing

International development

Population served info

Children and youth

Adolescents

Immigrants and migrants

Refugees and displaced people

Economically disadvantaged people

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

25% of first-generation immigrant children are living in poverty in the U.S. compared with 17% of non-immigrant children. Language barriers and cultural differences create challenges to accessing basic resources and educational support for immigrant and refugee youth. Access to extracurricular activities is severely limited due to a lack of parental involvement (conflicting work schedules), lack of affordable opportunities, and the geographical location of the neighborhoods where these youth and their families live. Furthermore, immigrant and refugee youth lack access to post-secondary school exploration employment opportunities. For immigrant and refugee students, completing any level of education beyond high school is difficult due to a limited understanding of the U.S. education system and minimal parental involvement caused by language barriers. In Pennsylvania, only 54% of students from immigrant and refugee backgrounds who begin college go on to graduate.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sport-based Youth Development

Since 2019, Open Field has implemented SBYD programming twice per week for nearly 100 youth ages 6-18 in Crafton Heights and Northview Heights. We create a safe space on soccer fields in or nearby these communities so youth can walk to the field, eliminating one of the biggest challenges to participation in extra-curricular activities (transportation).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

CHAMPS - (CHange Agents Mentoring Peers through Sport)
After participating in training workshops and seminars, teenagers are employed as assistant coaches and referees. They learn transferable skills and how to apply and interview for jobs to prepare them for their future. They serve as role models to younger kids in their neighborhood.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Open Field partners with the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) to manage a club soccer team that supports first-generation, foreign-born student-athletes to earn their associate degrees and get higher-paying jobs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Young adults

We are proud to partner with organizations across the region to provide high-quality SBYD programming for hundreds of youth every year. Partners include ARYSE, Frick Park Tennis Association, Latino Community Center, Mooncrest Neighborhood Programs, Pittsburgh Public Schools, South Hills Interfaith Movement, and Woodland Hills School District.

Population(s) Served

Teams of high school-age youth represent their neighborhood on Open Field teams in the Citiparks futsal league each winter. In the fall, we partner with Elliot West End Athletic Association to register more than 65 refugee youth ages 9-18 in their annual soccer league, nearly doubling participation in three age groups, expanding diversity, and promoting equity within the league.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
Immigrants and migrants
Immigrants and migrants
Children and youth
Immigrants and migrants
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sport-based Youth Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our peer educators take a leadership role in organizing community service projects at least twice per year in their neighborhoods.

Number of youth who demonstrate civic participation skills (e.g., compromise, perspective-taking)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

CHAMPS: Teen Employment and Leadership

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each neighborhood and program site has Youth Leaders who serve as mentors. Thelp to identify issues affecting youth to incorporate into soccer activities and develop community service projects

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sport-based Youth Development

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth participants are girls and boys who are consistently and actively engaged in our programming on a weekly basis for most of the year.

Number of employment placements defined as temporary or seasonal

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

CHAMPS: Teen Employment and Leadership

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community Leaders, Youth Leaders, Assistant Coach Mentors, and Youth Referees are employment opportunities for youth to learn future skills.

Number of individuals applying skills learned through the organization's training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sport-based Youth Development

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

More than 90% of youth participants self-report they apply what they learn from Open Field to their daily lives, in school, at home, or in their community with peers.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Open Field improves the lives and futures of youth through sport. We promote education, health, girls’ empowerment, leadership, and workforce readiness through the global game of soccer.

Open Field's framework for educational soccer-based activities promotes health, education, and leadership skill-building in youth ages 6-18. For young adults around the ages of 18-23, Open Field supports students from marginalized communities to explore postsecondary education options to secure their futures and get higher-paying jobs. The model is effective because it empowers teenagers and young adults from within the community to engage in key leadership roles and teaches transferable leadership skills.

Our programming provides hundreds of hours of leadership experiences for participants including mentoring, peer education, exploratory field trips, workforce development, and community service. Immigrant and refugee youth gain personal and professional skills, on-the-job training, resources to opportunities after high school, and access to future employment.

Open Field’s programming creates a safe space in low-resource neighborhoods where youth from diverse backgrounds come together to play and learn as equals. Our programming incorporates Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) for children ages 6-18 through activities and discussions on and off the soccer field. Working closely with community partners, we design our programming to meet the unique needs of the population in the neighborhood where we work, so it’s culturally relevant and meets youth where they are. We foster mentoring relationships with adult coach mentors using a trauma-informed methodology.

Furthermore, our coach mentors create a safe space that encourages girls to participate in sport-based youth development programs that prepare them to play high school soccer and feel a stronger sense of belonging. We build trust with parents to ensure they have the same opportunities as their brothers

In addition, we employ teenagers as Youth Leaders through our CHAMPS youth leadership program, providing them with the skills and experience they need to be successful in school now and in the workforce in the future. After participating in training workshops and seminars where they learn transferable skills (communication, decision-making, and conflict resolution), teenagers are employed as assistant coaches and referees. They become role models to younger kids in their neighborhood

We utilize a proven approach known as sport-based youth development (SBYD) that leverages the passion and character-building attributes of team sport to create positive outcomes beyond the field. Our approach to SBYD is informed by Open Field's decade of experience working in SBYD programs in Cameroon, Africa. Because soccer is an integral part of culture around the world, it provides a sense of familiarity, belonging, and opportunity that many foreign-born youths in Pittsburgh do not feel in other spaces.

Since 2010, Open Field’s global team has engaged more than 5,000 youth in educational soccer programming and mentoring relationships in Cameroon, Africa and Pittsburgh, PA. Open Field partners with several youth-serving and cultural organizations to reach youth from immigrant, refugee, and minority communities in the city. Open Field partnered with the Somali Bantu Community Association of Pittsburgh and Youth Places to launch our CHAMPS youth leadership program in Northview Heights for Black African and American-born children.

Additionally, we have teamed up with JFCS Pittsburgh and Alliance for Refugee Youth Support and Education (ARYSE) to run programming for newly resettled refugee youth in Crafton Heights. In 2020, we shifted our programs virtual to reach more youth through collaboration with the Bhutanese Community Association of Pittsburgh and Casa San Jose and launched our first Girls Program. In 2021, we facilitated programming for more than 450 youth across Allegheny County with seven partners. In 2022, we partnered with the Elliot-West End Soccer League to register over 25 youth participants across three age divisions to play a fall season of competitive soccer with peers from outside their community.

In 2022, Open Field launched its new College Program with the creation of a club soccer team at Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC). The program supports students from marginalized communities in the greater Pittsburgh region, primarily immigrants and refugees, to obtain their associate degrees and get higher-paying jobs. Program staff and mentors support students in obtaining the services they need, whether it’s course selection, academic support, financial assistance, or social-emotional support.

A Survey of Long-time Program Participants Found That:
• 96% Gained leadership skills they use today
• 90% Performed better in school
• 85% Learned how to set and achieve goals
• 93% Noticed a 'big change' in themselves after participating
• 97% Say important decisions they made were shaped by their experience

In 2021, we administered pre-season surveys in the spring and post-surveys in the fall to participants and noted positive changes resulting from their involvement in our programs. Youth participants’ responses were significantly higher in the following areas:

• Proud of their talents which are different than their friends
• Like the way they look
• Believe they can do whatever they set their mind to
• Know many adults whom they can trust and go to for help

Through partnerships with Chris Nedelcovych Soccer Foundation (Guinea) and K'Powa Women (Liberia), Open Field is expanding our SBYD programming in two more countries in West Africa in 2023-2024. In addition to youth programming, we are exploring the potential for 'place-making' efforts to improve local soccer pitches and cultural immersion experiences to connect our supporters to service-learning opportunities abroad.

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.00

Average of 27.84 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8.7

Average of 3.1 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

39%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Open Field

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Open Field

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Open Field

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Open Field’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $36,394 -$13,378 $19,890 $135,957 $189
As % of expenses 19.9% -6.9% 10.5% 53.5% 0.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $36,394 -$13,378 $19,890 $135,957 -$5,477
As % of expenses 19.9% -6.9% 10.5% 53.5% -1.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $219,687 $179,166 $259,074 $389,890 $412,046
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% -18.4% 44.6% 50.5% 5.7%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 3.4% 4.1%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 7.7% 1.7%
All other grants and contributions 98.9% 100.0% 92.6% 88.8% 94.2%
Other revenue 1.1% 0.0% 1.1% 0.1% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $183,293 $192,544 $189,694 $254,123 $363,657
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 5.0% -1.5% 34.0% 43.1%
Personnel 17.8% 36.8% 37.6% 30.1% 31.5%
Professional fees 9.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.7% 5.4%
Occupancy 0.6% 0.0% 0.7% 0.9% 2.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 72.6% 63.2% 61.7% 68.2% 61.0%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $183,293 $192,544 $189,694 $254,123 $369,323
One month of savings $15,274 $16,045 $15,808 $21,177 $30,305
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $33,995
Total full costs (estimated) $198,567 $208,589 $205,502 $275,300 $433,623

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.7 2.2 6.5 11.3 8.7
Months of cash and investments 2.7 2.2 6.5 11.3 8.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.7 2.7 4.0 9.4 5.4
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $41,987 $35,483 $102,238 $240,037 $262,447
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $33,995
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 16.7%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 1.9% 0.4% 0.0%
Unrestricted net assets $56,284 $42,906 $62,796 $198,753 $193,276
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $49,490 $49,300 $97,500
Total net assets $56,284 $42,906 $112,286 $248,053 $290,776

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Founder and CEO

Justin Forzano

Forzano is the founder and CEO of Open Field (formerly CameroonFDP). Forzano has more than a decade of experience working on community development projects in Africa and holds a Master's in Public Policy Management from the University of Pittsburgh and a Bachelor's of Civil Engineering from the University of Dayton. A social entrepreneur, Forzano is committed to utilizing sport as a driver for social change. He is an Albert Schweitzer Fellow for Life.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Open Field

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Open Field

Board of directors
as of 01/24/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Steve Harris

Dentons

Term: 2021 - 2023

Kim Cermak

Athena Group International

Sylvia Nanji

Nanji & Associates

Martell Covington

Legislative Aide for Senator Bob Casey

Matthew Weissberg

PNC Bank

David Hackworth

CNX Resources

Carly Carstens

The Ellis School

Steven Harris

Cohen & Grigsby

Jen Wagner

BNY Mellon

Danny McElhinny

Consultant

Tiffany Castagno

HR Consultant

Stephanie Harrison

Licensed Therapist

Alissa Repanshek

Price Waterhouse Cooper

Sally Nedelcovych

Retired

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/31/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data