PLATINUM2024

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

aka Florida Wildlife Corridor   |   St. Petersburg, FL   |  www.floridawildlifecorridor.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

EIN: 20-1822793


Mission

Our Mission is to champion a collaborative campaign to permanently connect, protect and restore the Florida Wildlife Corridor. We are a unifying voice that provides a window into wild Florida. We seek landscape-scale conservation through high quality, impactful, and authentic storytelling. We partner with organizations and individuals nearly as diverse as the wildlife we aim to protect. Though many don’t yet know it, Florida’s long term economic prosperity and quality of life depends on a healthy and sustainable ecosystem. Using a science-based approach, on-the-ground knowledge of the Corridor, and the support of thousands of followers throughout the state and nation, we work to identify and elevate the most pressing threats and opportunities facing the Corridor.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Florida Wildlife Corridor is a connected wild area that ensures the long-term survival of many native species, as well as the health of our waters and Florida’s rural way of life. Without long-term protection, significant portions of the Florida Wildlife Corridor are at risk of fragmentation - either by roads or other development. Fragmenting the Corridor threatens the ability of wildlife to travel, restricts breeding opportunities and ultimately harms plant and animal communities. Fragmentation would also be detrimental to Florida’s fresh water resources. We have a fleeting opportunity to keep natural and rural landscapes connected in order to protect the waters that sustain us, the working farms and ranches that feed us, the forests that clean our air, the coastal zones that protect us from storms and the habitat that all of these lands provide for Florida’s diverse wildlife.

Ruling year info

2007

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Mallory Lykes Dimmitt

Main address

2606 Fairfield Ave S, Building 7

St. Petersburg, FL 33712 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Legacy Institute for Nature and Culture

EIN

20-1822793

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Environment

Natural resources

Population served info

Adolescents

Adults

Students

Teachers

Researchers

Show more populations served

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (A12)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Florida Wildlife Corridor encompasses nearly 18 million acres of land, over 8 million of which are not yet permanently protected. Within the Corridor there are 1300 rivers, 23 of Florida’s 30 outstanding springs, 75 state parks, and 7 million acres of working lands. The Corridor is a critical feature of Florida’s landscape. It provides habitat to iconic wildlife such as the Florida black bear, and Florida panther. Over 2000 unique species of flora and fauna call the Corridor home, 60 of which are listed as threatened or endangered. To protect these species, we must protect the Corridor. The Corridor holds inherent scientific, recreational, and cultural value. It also delivers measurable socioeconomic benefits to the state, including 114,000 jobs and at least $30 billion in annual value to sectors such as recreation, tourism, agriculture, ranching, and forestry. With Florida currently gaining approximately 1,000 new residents every day, these critical lands are being lost.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

2023 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition

Our expeditions and subsequent films involve unique treks to tell the story of the importance of connecting, protecting and restoring the Florida Wildlife Corridor. These Expeditions include a robust media campaign to share the Corridor concept and vision and highlight the real time tension in at-risk areas (“bottlenecks”) in the Corridor where development or fragmentation could permanently sever the habitat connection. Each expedition we embark on has been tailored to a unique landscape within the Corridor. We capture the journey of each expedition to share stories of wild Florida with the public with the goal of raising visibility of the critical mission of connecting, protecting and restoring the Florida Wildlife Corridor that will benefit generations of Floridians to come.

Population(s) Served

The annual Summit brings together stakeholders from across the state, from ridge to reef, engaging state and federal leaders to brainstorm about scaling of our collective efforts to accelerate success. The Summit will broaden the tent of supporters and create a collaborative environment for corridor connectivity implementation. This event will bring together stakeholders from across the state and will include opportunities to interact with local, state and federal policy makers. The Summit will engage a wide variety of partners and will facilitate conversation, innovation and planning that will result in concrete, actionable steps to protect the Corridor.

Population(s) Served

The Florida Wildlife Corridor plans to “go wild” by artistically promoting towns within and adjacent to the Corridor by embarking upon a mural campaign. We will design and create a series of fifty beautiful murals to be painted in fifty towns throughout the state up and down the corridor to promote the connection, protection and restoration of wild Florida. The goal is to create milepost destinations for visitors and citizens alike, in highly visible, well trafficked areas. Other than the donation of the use of the wall itself, there will be no cost to the towns or property owners.

Population(s) Served

We’re carving a unique path and creating a model for Zoos, festivals, and conserved land partners across Florida to easily collaborate with us on large-scale public facing exhibits. As the geographic Florida Wildlife Corridor gains in popularity, there has been a growing interest from zoos to engage with organizations that work to protect this geography. This enthusiasm is leveraged through the creation of exhibits that tell the stories of the Corridor with the inspiration and curiosity of an exploring scientist. As a visitor walks through the exhibits, they feel as if a scientist has opened up their field journal to share the secret wonders of wild Florida.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation champions a collaborative campaign to permanently connect, protect and restore the Florida Wildlife Corridor – a statewide network of connected lands and waters that supports wildlife and people. We align efforts to lead conservation of the Corridor’s highest priorities, accelerates connectivity by providing tools and resources that elevate partners’ work, and celebrates collective Corridor successes through storytelling and art. Our programs include the multi-day summit called Corridor Connect, expeditions, film screenings and presentation, Corridor curriculum, the Corridor mural campaign, and sharing a window into wild Florida through exhibits, installations, and their gallery. These actions raise awareness of the Corridor and inspire support statewide and beyond for the protection of the missing links in the Corridor.

The Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation partners with organizations and individuals nearly as diverse as the wildlife we aim to protect. We cultivate awareness and action through film, photography, painting, drawing, mapping, storytelling, and expeditions. Florida’s long term economic prosperity and quality of life depends on a healthy and sustainable ecosystem. Using a science-based approach, on-the-ground knowledge of the Corridor, and the support of thousands of followers throughout the state and nation, we work to identify and elevate the most pressing threats and opportunities facing the Corridor.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 2021 Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc. Financial Statements
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.63

Average of 11169.58 over 9 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.5

Average of 11.6 over 9 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

16%

Average of 13% over 9 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

* This organization changed its fiscal year accounting period in 2019. Please refer to its 2019 990s for more information.

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 * 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $204,456 $695,483 $109,846 $2,017,966 -$186,298
As % of expenses 58.0% 195.6% 10.5% 79.7% -3.5%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $204,456 $695,483 $109,846 $2,017,766 -$189,331
As % of expenses 58.0% 195.6% 10.5% 79.7% -3.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $556,983 $1,046,441 $1,250,776 $4,481,390 $5,639,869
Total revenue, % change over prior year 180.2% 87.9% 19.5% 258.3% 25.9%
Program services revenue 21.0% 18.4% 65.0% 5.5% 0.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.7% 2.8% 4.6% 1.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 79.0% 80.8% 32.1% 89.9% 98.5%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $352,285 $355,566 $1,047,328 $2,531,922 $5,395,522
Total expenses, % change over prior year 104.3% 0.9% 194.6% 141.8% 113.1%
Personnel 25.5% 14.7% 12.6% 18.3% 16.5%
Professional fees 13.8% 16.3% 15.4% 60.1% 6.7%
Occupancy 1.3% 1.3% 0.5% 0.8% 2.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 1.6%
All other expenses 59.4% 67.7% 71.5% 20.8% 72.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $352,285 $355,566 $1,047,328 $2,532,122 $5,398,555
One month of savings $29,357 $29,631 $87,277 $210,994 $449,627
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $7,210 $10,696
Total full costs (estimated) $381,642 $385,197 $1,134,605 $2,750,326 $5,858,878

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 10.3 12.4 6.9 12.2 2.5
Months of cash and investments 10.3 33.6 21.1 27.3 9.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 10.2 33.6 18.9 17.3 7.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $301,987 $366,967 $602,544 $2,572,099 $1,103,825
Investments $0 $628,148 $1,242,092 $3,187,947 $3,248,934
Receivables $0 $0 $30,150 $2,460 $93,657
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $9,183 $9,183 $9,183 $7,210 $17,905
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 2.8% 18.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.8% 0.0% 0.4% 34.2% 33.1%
Unrestricted net assets $299,628 $995,111 $1,645,283 $3,663,049 $3,473,718
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $222,333 $134,110 $62,869
Total net assets $299,628 $995,111 $1,867,616 $3,797,159 $3,536,587

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Mallory Lykes Dimmitt

Mallory Dimmitt is the inaugural CEO of the Corridor Coalition and former Vice President of Strategic Development for Lykes Bros. Inc., a fifth-generation family-owned agribusiness based in Florida. Previously, Mallory led The Nature Conservancy’s Colorado Plateau Initiative from Telluride, Colorado, assessing large-scale conservation opportunities in a four-state region of the West, and prior to that directed the Southwest Colorado Project for the Conservancy’s Colorado Chapter. She has served as a member of Telluride’s Town Council and has worked with local, regional, state, and federal agencies and organizations on natural resource issues. Mallory earned her B.S. in Natural Resources from the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. She was awarded a Doris Duke Conservation Fellowship at Duke University’s Nicholas School of Environment, where she earned a Masters of Environmental Management (MEM) in Environmental Economics and Policy.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Florida Wildlife Corridor Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

PJ Marinelli

Riverglades Family Offices

Term: 2023 - 2025

Amanda Moore

National Wildlife Federation

Chad Rischar

DRMP, Inc.

Oscar Anderson

The Southern Group

Tiffany Busby

Wildwood Consulting

Gage Couch

Cadence

Kimberly Davis Reyher

Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana

Maurice Pearson

MSE Group

Lynn Cherry

Carpe Diem Community Solutions

Blake Poole

Bernstein Private Wealth Management

Arnie Bellini

Bellini Better World

Scott Nolan

WUSF

Robert McLean

Rocke, McLean & Sbar

Zak Gezon

Disney Conservation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/22/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.