PLATINUM2024

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

aka Behrhorst Partners for Development (BPD)   |   New York, NY   |  www.aldeaguatemala.org
GuideStar Charity Check

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

EIN: 13-6266540


Mission

The shared mission of ALDEA and our Guatemalan sister organization, Asociacion BPD (ABPD), is to promote integrated development services that improve the well-being of families with limited resources, especially in rural Mayan areas. Our shared vision is that these communities are empowered and capable of achieving sustainable, culturally pertinent, and equitable development that guarantees their right to health and well-being.

Ruling year info

1968

Executive Director

Arianne Peterson

Main address

99 Wall Street #970

New York, NY 10005 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Behrhorst Clinic Foundation

EIN

13-6266540

Subject area info

Health

Nutrition

Malnutrition

Agriculture, fishing and forestry

Child welfare

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Families

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Single Organization Support (K11)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than half of Guatemalans live in poverty, and the country has the fourth highest rate of chronic childhood malnutrition in the world. In rural indigenous communities, where 40 percent of people live on less than $1.90/day, chronic childhood malnutrition can affect up to 90 percent of children. Stunting is the telltale sign of chronic malnutrition, but this devastating problem also causes cognitive impairments that prevent children from reaching their full potential. ALDEA works alongside communities to improve health and well-being through an integrated approach that includes agriculture and nutrition, sanitation infrastructure, family planning, disaster risk reduction, and community empowerment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Building Healthy Families through Community Mobilization, Nutrition, and Infrastructure

Our overarching strategic objective is to improve the health and well-being of Mayan families in rural Guatemala through lasting, community-driven solutions. To accomplish this objective, we use a process of community mobilization that targets a major health-related problem in Guatemala: chronic childhood malnutrition.

As communities work together to address high rates of chronic childhood malnutrition, they also acquire the skills necessary to move forward with their own development processes in the future to address other self-identified needs.

Our approach consists of three strategies that mutually reinforce each other:

Strategy 1: Mobilize and empower communities - including men, women, and youth - to work together to achieve local development.

Strategy 2: Support communities to improve their basic infrastructure.
a) Increase access to potable water and environmental sanitation (including latrines, gray water filters, and efficient stoves).
b) Assist communities to respond to natural disasters and reduce their vulnerability to future disasters.

Strategy 3: Support families to improve household nutrition.
a) Improve food security by introducing ecologically sustainable agriculture techniques adapted to the effects
of global climate change (food production, storage of basic grains, and development of family gardens).
b) Teach families to achieve healthy nutrition during the first 1,000 days (pregnancy and the first two years of
a child’s life).
c) Increase access to family planning information and methods

Population(s) Served
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of water projects built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As sister organizations, ALDEA and ABPD are working together to address the principal needs of rural, predominantly Mayan communities in the Department of Chimaltenango in Guatemala. ALDEA is a 501(c)(3) organization based in the U.S. and focuses on advocacy, education, and fund development to support ABPD’s work in the field. On the ground in Guatemala, ABPD, a largely-indigenous organization, empowers rural villages to address the devastating effects of poverty and disadvantage. Through a grassroots development approach, ALDEA and ABPD help communities understand and tackle the root causes of the multifaceted problem of chronic malnutrition in infants and young children. The process is designed to achieve both short-term and longer-term results. In the short term, our programs lead to measurable improvements in chronic childhood malnutrition by supporting families to improve water and sanitation, infant and young children feeding, family planning, and other key drivers of malnutrition. Equally important, the positive experience of mobilizing to reduce chronic malnutrition gives community
members the improved organizational and problem-solving skills they will need to find locally-driven solutions to additional priorities going forward.

Our overarching strategic objective is to improve the health and well-being of Mayan families in rural Guatemala through lasting, community-driven solutions. To accomplish this objective, we use a process of community mobilization that targets a major health-related problem in Guatemala: chronic childhood malnutrition.

As communities work together to address high rates of chronic childhood malnutrition, they also acquire the skills necessary to move forward with their own development processes in the future to address other self-identified needs.

Our approach consists of three strategies that mutually reinforce each other:

Strategy 1: Mobilize and empower communities - including men, women, and youth - to work together to achieve local development.

Strategy 2: Support communities to improve their basic infrastructure.
a) Increase access to potable water and environmental sanitation (including latrines, gray water filters, and efficient stoves).
b) Assist communities to respond to natural disasters and reduce their vulnerability to future disasters.

Strategy 3: Support families to improve household nutrition.
a) Improve food security by introducing ecologically sustainable agriculture techniques adapted to the effects
of global climate change (food production, storage of basic grains, and development of family gardens).
b) Teach families to achieve healthy nutrition during the first 1,000 days (pregnancy and the first two years of
a child’s life).
c) Increase access to family planning information and methods

Our approach to grassroots development draws on over 50 years of experience working in partnership with Mayan communities. In 1962, Dr. Carroll Behrhorst founded a vitally needed health program in Chimaltenango, Guatemala. From the start, he trained community promoters to play key roles in advancing durable solutions to the root causes of poverty. Within a few years, the program grew into a creative engine for community health and development activities, pioneering an array of village-based approaches. ALDEA was established in the United States in 1967 to support this innovative program, and we continue to work within his philosophy of community development more than 50 years later. In 2006, ALDEA helped to create Asociación BPD in Guatemala (ABPD), an independent organization that ALDEA funds to carry out our work.

The ABPD Executive Director has over 20 years of experience working on development issues, and has directed ABPD for eight years. He holds an MS in Environmental Management and has worked for international and local development organizations including UNDP, ILO and Oxfam. ABPD has supported the construction of sanitation infrastructure in over 80 villages, building over 4000 latrines and gray water filters. Overall, our development strategy has been very effective. We have not only partnered with communities to build needed infrastructure, but we have created a sustainable program by providing training to, and empowering, local leaders.

Our Guatemala-based field staff is Mayan and come from the area of intervention. They speak the indigenous Kaqchikel language and have an intimate understanding of the context of the population with whom they work. We implement our projects using the internationally recognized SARAR method. This participatory training method has been recognized for its suitability for rural populations, and emphasizes the strengths, knowledge and experiences of the individual communities.

Since 2006, ALDEA has partnered with 111 communities where we have constructed 70 water systems benefiting more than 35,000 people, installed 7,278 gray water filters and more than 7,000 latrines and efficient stoves, and trained 2,500 women on combating childhood malnutrition. Over 4,500 women, youth, local authorities, and men have engaged in our community mobilization and empowerment programs. More than 11,000 people have learned about family planning through our programs, and in our earlier work we constructed 24 community schools.

During our 2019 fiscal year (July 2018-June 2019) 1,809 families took part in the challenge of improving their own lives with our support, meaning we worked with more than 10,000 people. We have significantly reduced the rate of chronic childhood malnutrition in the nine communities in which the full program was implemented thanks in large part to these fiscal year 2019 accomplishments:

- 613 women, 83 men, 182 youth, 99 local authorities engaged in leadership development & empowerment training
- In the 4 communities completing their first year of partnership with us, 19% of women in our programs now participate in development committees (up from 3% initially).
- In the five communities graduating from our program, 33% of women in our programs now participate in development committees (up from 1% initially).
- 4 water systems completed with 2 in progress, serving 945 families.
- 525 vented latrines installed.
- 870 efficient stoves installed.
- 254 gray water filters installed.
- 659 women with 392 children under 5 trained in healthy nutrition practices.
- 676 women participated in agriculture training; 90% of families have gardens.
- 977 households received home visits by a family planning specialist.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The COVID pandemic makes it difficult to collect feedback in group settings and has restricted our a

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

41.08

Average of 66.18 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5

Average of 5.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

8%

Average of 7% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$17,911 $67,225 $117,707 -$226,638 $33,561
As % of expenses -2.2% 9.7% 15.3% -24.7% 3.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$17,911 $67,225 $117,707 -$226,638 $33,561
As % of expenses -2.2% 9.7% 15.3% -24.7% 3.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $832,535 $711,084 $842,276 $780,456 $932,975
Total revenue, % change over prior year 8.5% -14.6% 18.4% -7.3% 19.5%
Program services revenue 6.4% 3.0% 0.6% 1.4% 5.7%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 2.5% 2.2% 0.0% 1.6% 3.1%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 91.1% 94.8% 99.4% 96.9% 91.2%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $796,781 $695,347 $771,148 $917,876 $923,503
Total expenses, % change over prior year 9.5% -12.7% 10.9% 19.0% 0.6%
Personnel 13.1% 12.4% 12.3% 13.7% 13.8%
Professional fees 4.4% 6.8% 6.9% 4.7% 5.6%
Occupancy 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 69.2% 73.4% 75.8% 78.0% 69.5%
All other expenses 13.3% 7.4% 5.0% 3.7% 11.1%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $796,781 $695,347 $771,148 $917,876 $923,503
One month of savings $66,398 $57,946 $64,262 $76,490 $76,959
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $863,179 $753,293 $835,410 $994,366 $1,000,462

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 3.2 8.2 8.1 4.9 5.0
Months of cash and investments 15.7 18.7 19.0 13.4 14.0
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 11.8 14.7 15.1 9.7 10.1
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $214,347 $473,549 $517,838 $377,541 $386,986
Investments $829,309 $610,620 $701,938 $645,674 $692,877
Receivables $13,001 $0 $30,000 $33,029 $6,235
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.0% 1.1% 1.2% 2.6% 1.9%
Unrestricted net assets $785,770 $852,995 $970,702 $744,064 $777,625
Temporarily restricted net assets $260,420 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $260,420 $219,410 $264,077 $284,971 $287,760
Total net assets $1,046,190 $1,072,405 $1,234,779 $1,029,035 $1,065,385

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Arianne Peterson

Having been with the organization since 2014, Arianne Peterson became ALDEA’s Executive Director in July 2019. She oversees all U.S.-based operations including administration, fundraising, communications, and outreach. Arianne holds an M.A. in English from the University of St. Thomas – Minnesota and a B.A. in anthropology from Arizona State University, where her interest in international development began with a semester spent studying in Thailand. She has also worked as an advocate for environmental, food justice, and anti-nuclear causes.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

ALDEA: Advancing Local Development through Empowerment and Action, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/02/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Deborah Walters

Wayne Gilbert

Bruce Robbins

Deborah Walters

Yvonne Gatz

Jonathan Maupin

Cynthia Sultz

Thomas Sharpe

Gordon Starkebaum

Pamela Winthrop

Cary Hill

Cindy Swatek

Johnny Walker

Oscar Torres

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No