PLATINUM2023

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

aka AAF, AAFPBC   |   Lake Worth, FL   |  www.aafpbc.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

EIN: 59-2471253


Mission

Adopt-A-Family's mission is to strengthen families with children in their efforts to achieve stability and self-sufficiency by providing access to all-encompassing services.

Adopt-A-Family aims to reduce and prevent family homelessness and ensure that children from homeless and low-income households have an increased chance to succeed.

Ruling year info

1985

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Matthew V. Constantine, LCSW

Main address

1712 Second Ave North

Lake Worth, FL 33460 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-2471253

Subject area info

Human services

Basic and emergency aid

Family services

Homeless shelters

Population served info

Families

Homeless people

Low-income people

At-risk youth

Students

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Adopt-A-Family aims to address several problems and unmet needs in Palm Beach County: family homelessness, the lack of affordable housing, and the barriers and academic deficits faced by children from homeless and at-risk households.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing Stabilization Program

The Housing Stabilization Program (HSP) is an innovative homeless prevention program that targets families in crisis who are on the verge of homelessness and provides rent/mortgage assistance paired with case management to stabilize the household and enable them to remain stably housed.

Population(s) Served
Families

Project Grow, Adopt-A-Family’s afterschool/summer program for elementary-aged children who have experienced homelessness and poverty, uses a holistic approach and robust curriculum to help its students overcome academic setbacks and emotional traumas.

Population(s) Served
Students
At-risk youth

Adopt-A-Family operates 24 affordable rentals for hardworking income-constrained families in Lake Worth, Florida.

Population(s) Served
Families

Service Enriched Housing is an innovative 31-unit housing program for low-income households dedicated to the pursuit of increased financial stability and homeownership.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

The Sen. Philip D. Lewis Homeless Resource Center (HRC) is the central point of access for all homeless services in Palm Beach County. Under Adopt-A-Family management since 2016, the Family Division of the HRC is the base for the agency's diversion and rapid re-housing efforts. Through assessment, housing placement, and comprehensive case management, Adopt-A-Family's HRC team provides critical resources to our community's highest-needs families.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

Project SAFE, Adopt-A-Family's longest running Permanent Supportive Housing program, provides a safe, consistent, and nurturing environment for 32 families experiencing homelessness. All resident families have at least one head of household living with a disability. Each resident of Project SAFE receives support from an on-site case manager. This includes providing families with access to financial literacy training, educational opportunities, mental health referrals, job coaching, life-skills training, and affordable child care.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

Program REACH is Palm Beach County's largest emergency family shelter, with 19 units of housing available for 90-day stays. Through intensive, housing-focused case management, this program focuses on the immediate stabilization of each family while working to obtain permanent housing solutions. REACH also provides a food pantry, a clothing closet, housewares, computer access, access to tutoring, and referrals to ancillary services.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

Wiley Reynolds Gardens Apartments provides nine units of affordable housing paired with case management for employed households experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

The Mental Health/Wellness Program began in August of 2016, with the primary goal of eliminating barriers to mental health services for the Adopt-A-Family's high-needs clients, ultimately improving their mental health and family functioning. Adopt-A-Family's onsite therapist is available for crisis intervention and de-escalation, and provides guidance to case managers of the families.

The agency's on-site Job Coach Program launched in November 2020 and provides Workforce Assessments, resume and interview guidance, and vocational counseling. This program helps adult residential clients explore and establish career goals, helping unemployed residental clients find jobs and underemployed clients get better jobs.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Unemployed people
Economically disadvantaged people

Opened in June 2020, Julian Place comprises 14 two-, three-, and four-bedroom townhomes for families on the verge of homelessness. This program, a unique partnership with a nearby Title 1 school, is designed to improve children’s educational outcomes through housing stability. Julian Place aims to disrupt poverty and homelessness for at-risk families of children who attend our nearby sister school. As part of this initiative, Adopt-A-Family will track children's academic progress through high school.

Population(s) Served
Families
Families
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Four-Star Rating 2010

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2011

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2012

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2013

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2014

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2015

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2016

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2017

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2018

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2019

Charity Navigator

Four-Star Rating 2020

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of families that the Housing Stabilization Program prevents from becoming homeless each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families

Related Program

Housing Stabilization Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Because of skyrocketing rent prices, the average amount required to stabilize a family has doubled since 2019, and therefore the agency is more limited in the amount of families it is able to serve.

Percentage of program participants that remained in or exited to permanent housing at the end of the operating year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Homeless people, People with disabilities

Related Program

Project SAFE

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The ultimate goal of agency housing programs is to provide housing stability to the families served.

Percentage of elementary school students attending agency's afterschool program who were promoted to the next grade.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth, Homeless people

Related Program

Project Grow

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric measures promotion rates of the students attending Project Grow, the agency's afterschool program for homeless/low-income children.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Adopt-A-Family aims to address issues pertaining to family homelessness through housing, self-sufficiency, and educational programs. As the lead agency for families who are literally homeless in Palm Beach County, we provide permanent supportive housing in addition to referral and linkage services to best serve these families in crisis.

In addition to serving homeless families, we operate self-sufficiency programs that holistically address barriers faced by low-income, working families. This includes a high-impact homeless prevention program, a homeownership incubator program, a 14 unit affordable housing program that focuses on children's educational outcomes related to housing stability, and an affordable housing program with 24 units in the community.

Collectively, our self-sufficiency programs serve more than 300 low-income families in Palm Beach County in a given year.

The first step in addressing familial needs is to ensure that their basic needs are met. Adopt-A-Family provides housing solutions to families so they are able to begin focusing on issues that are negatively impacting their ability to remain self-sufficient. Our experience has shown the importance of addressing basic needs prior to working on educational and or occupational goals. As a result, all of the agency's programs place initial emphasis on ensuring that families are stably housed. Once housing is secured, case management and supportive services are provided focusing on job readiness, educational advancement, financial literacy, as well as ensuring that mental health issues are addressed.

Adopt-A-Family provides a continuum of housing services to meet the diverse needs of our clients. Some of the agency's housing units are restricted to families who are literally homeless (sleeping in a car, park, or emergency shelter), while other units target low-income working households interested in becoming homeowners. The agency also operates an extensive homeless prevention program which provides financial assistance to families at risk of becoming homeless. This program also includes meaningful supportive services in an effort to address all the barriers potentially impacting a familial stability.

In addition to the agency's activities surrounding housing, Adopt-A-Family operates a licensed afterschool and out-of-school program for children attending elementary school. The program is located within walking distance of many of the agency's housing programs and offers priority placement to homeless and formerly homeless children. This program, Project Grow, is one of the highest performing programs in Palm Beach County, and has been developed to meet the unique needs of low-income and formerly homeless children. Children receive socio-emotional services as well as intensive academic assistance. In 2014, Project Grow implemented an innovative STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) initiative that exposes disadvantaged children to career fields of the future.

Adopt-A-Family has 39 years of experience providing services to vulnerable families in Palm Beach County. During this time, the agency has garnered local and national recognition for its innovative programming, outcomes, and provision of supportive services. In its inaugural year, 1983, the agency served 15 families. Last year, the agency was able to assist 1,132 families in need of assistance.

Our capabilities are linked proportionally to the agency's proven ability to scale and deliver impressive programmatic outcomes, year after year. Prominent examples relate directly to the increased capacity of our Housing Stabilization Program, which has nearly tripled its capacity over the past three years. The program continues to garner local, state, and national funding support in its efforts to prevent homelessness for income-constrained families throughout Palm Beach County.

In 1992, the agency was awarded the first HUD Supportive Housing Demonstration grant in Palm Beach County. Since that time, the agency has significantly increased its affordable housing portfolio.

Currently, Adopt-A-Family is the largest provider of housing for homeless families in Palm Beach County and owns or operates 120 units of housing targeted for homeless and low-income families.

Adopt-A-Family has been recognized for its efforts in developing housing, providing supportive services, and for its fiscal responsibility. The agency was awarded the prestigious Bank of America Neighborhood Builder's Award in 2008.

In 2009, Adopt-A-Family received statewide praise for its nine-unit affordable housing program, Wiley Reynolds Apartments. The Florida Redevelopment Association awarded the project with its exclusive “Best Affordable Housing Development" designation.

In 2011, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the agency with two “Promising Practices" for the provision of supportive services to homeless families accessing housing services.

In 2021, Adopt-A-Family was awarded its 15th consecutive four-star rating from Charity Navigator. Less than 1% of the agencies measured by Charity Navigator accomplish this goal.

In our 39 years, we have;

• Provided much needed services to nearly 56,000 families who were homeless or at-risk of homelessness.

• Developed and maintained one of the most successful and competitive after-school programs in Palm Beach County.

• Built a well-respected reputation for being an agency that gets things done and is willing to partner with other agencies to serve families who are homeless in our community.

• Built a reputation for being an agency that efficiently and effectively uses donations to change lives.

Unfortunately, we have not eradicated homelessness in our community, but it is a goal that we stay motivated to reach with each family we help.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.51

Average of 5.75 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

7.4

Average of 6.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2023 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

25%

Average of 27% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $2,158,404 $3,879,277 $819,211 $5,388,121 -$712,676
As % of expenses 32.9% 54.7% 10.0% 63.1% -7.0%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $1,810,932 $3,533,070 $325,911 $4,869,179 -$1,248,724
As % of expenses 26.2% 47.5% 3.8% 53.8% -11.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $7,611,099 $8,358,401 $9,099,734 $14,622,438 $9,525,652
Total revenue, % change over prior year -7.3% 9.8% 8.9% 60.7% -34.9%
Program services revenue 6.4% 5.4% 5.4% 3.8% 6.6%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.5% 0.5% 0.1% 0.1% 1.2%
Government grants 46.9% 48.6% 44.2% 31.0% 49.7%
All other grants and contributions 46.1% 45.3% 50.0% 65.9% 41.0%
Other revenue 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% -0.8% 1.4%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $6,569,002 $7,095,612 $8,175,959 $8,533,366 $10,173,037
Total expenses, % change over prior year 8.7% 8.0% 15.2% 4.4% 19.2%
Personnel 56.0% 53.3% 51.5% 51.4% 49.1%
Professional fees 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.9% 2.5%
Occupancy 1.1% 1.0% 1.2% 1.2% 1.0%
Interest 0.2% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 29.5% 31.9% 31.8% 32.6% 36.6%
All other expenses 10.2% 10.7% 12.4% 11.9% 10.8%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Total expenses (after depreciation) $6,916,474 $7,441,819 $8,669,259 $9,052,308 $10,709,085
One month of savings $547,417 $591,301 $681,330 $711,114 $847,753
Debt principal payment $11,691 $12,482 $133,370 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $917,025 $3,447,525 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $8,392,607 $11,493,127 $9,483,959 $9,763,422 $11,556,838

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Months of cash 8.4 4.7 4.3 12.4 7.4
Months of cash and investments 8.4 4.7 4.3 12.4 9.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.6 5.9 5.8 12.8 9.5
Balance sheet composition info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Cash $4,578,121 $2,795,960 $2,942,337 $8,814,527 $6,283,333
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $2,040,063
Receivables $848,042 $906,636 $840,466 $977,467 $623,527
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $8,573,822 $11,885,241 $11,950,937 $12,133,596 $12,296,436
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 44.2% 33.6% 36.6% 39.6% 42.2%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 7.3% 9.0% 5.1% 3.1% 3.6%
Unrestricted net assets $7,690,961 $11,224,031 $11,549,942 $16,419,121 $15,170,397
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $3,272,188 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $3,272,188 $655,700 $760,264 $1,461,215 $1,526,506
Total net assets $10,963,149 $11,879,731 $12,310,206 $17,880,336 $16,696,903

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Matthew V. Constantine, LCSW

Chief Executive Officer Matthew Constantine, LCSW, has a 20-year history with the Adopt-A-Family. Prior to his promotion to CEO, Mr. Constantine served as the agency's Deputy Director, overseeing the agency's housing programs and many of the day-to-day operations. Mr. Constantine has a wealth of experience managing HUD-financed activities including Homeless Prevention/Rapid Re-Housing, Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2, and Supportive Housing Programs for families experiencing homelessness. Mr. Constantine is a 2017 graduate from Leadership Palm Beach County and currently serves on the Board of Directors of The Nonprofit Chamber of Palm Beach County. He has served as the Vice Chairman of the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency and was also an executive member of Palm Beach County’s Continuum of Care.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/05/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Kirstin Turner

John C. Castronuovo

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Penny Heller

Community Advocate

Garth E. Rosenkrance

Rehmann

Heather B. Ferguson

PNC Bank

Lynda Murphy

The Langford Group, LLC

Sean Bresnan

Wealth Partners Capital Group

John P. Marasco

Ernst & Young LLP

Kirstin Turner

RBC Wealth Management

Jeffrey W Preston

North American Development Group (NADG)

John Elder

Ernst & Young

Thomas C. Frankel

Frankel Enterprises

Jeff Preston

North American Development Group

Elizabeth Morales

School District of Palm Beach County

Jonathan Bain

NextEra Energy

Tequisha Myles

Legal Aid

Nancy J. Kyle

Community Advocate

Derek A. Porter

Earthrise Energy

Stephanie Gitlin

Halloran Sage

Takelia Hay

School District of Palm Beach County

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/20/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/30/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.