PLATINUM2024

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment

aka Goodwill NCW   |   Menasha, WI   |  www.goodwillncw.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

EIN: 39-1144913


Mission

The mission of Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc. is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment. Our vision is Transforming Lives. Our Guiding Principles: * Practice mission-based (our why) decision–making at all times. * Attract and retain talented team members. * Know the business, understand what we are doing and the related outcomes. * Focus on the experience of our customers and our team members. * Innovate and grow to impact the needs of our communities. * Be good stewards of the communities’ resources. Values: * Care for people * Be a great Goodwill team player * Own the business * Create your impact and celebrate the possible * Think big and take action * Be accountable

Ruling year info

1972

President/CEO

Christian Hess

Main address

1800 Appleton Road

Menasha, WI 54952 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

39-1144913

Subject area info

Recycling

Job training

Financial counseling

Human services

Vocational rehabilitation

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

People with disabilities

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Recycling (C27)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Goodwills mission services and retail operations start with donations. Its been that way since the Rev. Edgar Helms founded Goodwill in 1902 in Boston. A member of Goodwill Industries International, Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin has been serving 35 counties throughout north central Wisconsin communities since 1971. As a nonprofit, we use donations and shopping purchases to fund skills training in our communities to make a life-changing impact for the people we serve. The work always come back to the people whose lives we touch and serve and is part of our mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

GoodNeighbor

GoodNeighbor provides emergency assistance — on a referral basis only — to agency clients, allowing them to select products from our retail stores. Goodwill NCW relies on the expertise of local agencies to determine a client’s need for a certificate. A limited number of certificates are available throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

Miracle League of the Fox Valley is a program based on the principle that Every Child Deserves a Chance to Play Baseball. The Miracle League gives children with disabilities between the ages of 4 and 19 the opportunity to play baseball in an organized, non-competitive league on a safe, accessible baseball field with a synthetic surface. In addition to the importance of being able to play baseball, the Miracle League is also about making new friends, building self-esteem, and being treated just like other kids.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Miracle League of the Lakeshore is a program based on the principle that Every Child Deserves a Chance to Play Baseball. The Miracle League gives children with disabilities between the ages of 4 and 19 the opportunity to play baseball in an organized, non-competitive league on a safe, accessible baseball field with a synthetic surface. In addition to the importance of being able to play baseball, the Miracle League is also about making new friends, building self-esteem, and being treated just like other kids.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
People with disabilities

Miracle League of the Chippewa Valley is a program based on the principle that Every Child Deserves a Chance to Play Baseball. The Miracle League gives children with disabilities between the ages of 4 and 19 the opportunity to play baseball in an organized, non-competitive league on a safe, accessible baseball field with a synthetic surface. In addition to the importance of being able to play baseball, the Miracle League is also about making new friends, building self-esteem, and being treated just like other kids. Play is scheduled to begin in June 2017 in Eau Claire.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adolescents
Preteens

Financial Wellness Services is a program designed to help people find peace of mind and self-sufficiency through financial planning, education and counseling. We provide services such as educational workshops, individual and family financial/budget/credit counseling, and long-term assistance.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults
Seniors

Prosperity Center is designed to help people obtain post-secondary education that leads to career employment opportunities. Intake and assessment, case management, information and referral, and comprehensive wrap-around services (financial, vocational, life skills, etc.) are provided to participants who did not think that obtaining a college education was a realistic goal for them.
Support is available to participants from intake all the way through post-graduation employment.
This is a partnership program with the Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC).

Population(s) Served
Adults
Students

Payment Partner provides representative payee services to persons receiving checks from the Social Security Administration and bill-paying services for community members in general. Services provided include paying bills, budgeting, and money management in general.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Employment and Training Program is designed to support persons with disabilities in obtaining and maintaining employment in the community. The level of support provided on the job can range from short to longer term, depending on individual need.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
People with learning disabilities

Pre-employment Training Program is a longer-term training program for persons with disabilities that utilize the Goodwill worksite to develop work skills and behaviors.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
People with learning disabilities

Career Assessment is a program that assesses individual vocational interests, aptitudes, abilities, and needs through the use of comprehensive assessment and evaluation techniques.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Non-adult children

Work Assessment is a short-term training program for persons with disabilities that utilize the Goodwill worksite to develop work skills and behaviors.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with disabilities

Tomah Learning Independent Future Environments (L.I.F.E.) is a program designed to provide high school students with special needs with "real life” independent living and vocational training opportunities. The goal of this program is to facilitate the students’ eventual transition from high school to life after school.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
People with disabilities
Young adults

Goodwill NCW has partnerships throughout north central Wisconsin. Some examples:

Complete Service Area
Goodwill has established formal contractual work relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) throughout the service delivery area. These involve the local CRP providing a crew, including persons with disabilities, to perform work at the Goodwill Store/Training Center.

Fox Valley
Goodwill continues to have a role on the Fox Cities Workforce Development Center’s (FCWDC) Management Team and is "Employer of Record” for the FCWDC Receptionist.

Oshkosh/Fox Cities/Waupaca
Career EXCELerate - a collaborative career-training program between Goodwill NCW, Fox Valley Tech and Rawhide Youth Services.

New London
Partnership with Rawhide Youth Services teaching digital and social skills to disadvantaged youth.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Partners with Business 2020

Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental Disabilities

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Goodwill NCW, including GoodNeighbor, has served more than 31,000 people for four consecutive years. More than half of those people were supported by emergency assistance at our retail stores.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of press releases developed and distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Most press releases are of seasonal nature, dealing with mission impact stories, donation needs or promotional events/campaigns.

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We continue to work on growing our email list, while ensuring the accuracy and relevance of those subscribed.

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We've seen very positive growth in website traffic over the past three years. In 2022, we redesigned our site to lead with mission

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment. Its why we do what we do. We repurpose the used goods donated to Goodwill, sell them in our retail stores and training centers and use the revenues to support the programs and services that improve lives and our communities.

At Goodwill NCW we provide pathways for people who are underserved, underrepresented and/or disadvantaged who have a goal of building job skills that lead to sustained employment and improved financial stability.

Since filing Articles of Incorporation in 1971 as a not-for-profit corporation, Goodwill NCW has existed solely to address the social and human service needs of Wisconsins most vulnerable individuals and families. Today, Goodwill NCW services across the State of Wisconsin focus on helping individuals with barriers secure the life skills and workforce development and training supports they need to obtain and retain gainful employment to support themselves and their families. Goodwill NCW, unlike the majority of nonprofit organizations around the country, is a self-funded social service organization. The business model functions by collecting donated used materials that households no longer want or need, keeping those 50 million pounds of household materials out of our landfills each year. The goods are then sold at reduced prices in thrift stores to those who need or seek lower-priced goods. All proceeds are invested back into the organization and into operating social services across the state.

The programs and services of Goodwill NCW make a life-changing difference in our communities by eliminating barriers to employment through job training, addressing financial literacy, promoting access to services and supporting community participation.

Goodwill has been practicing sustainability since 1902 through the use of secondhand goods and responsible recycling. We approach sustainability from a people, planet and prosperity perspective.

Goodwill NCW’s mission begins with the communities’ support through donations. These donations in turn are sorted and merchandised for sale in our stores, which provide meaningful training and employment opportunities for people across the 35 Wisconsin counties we serve.

The resources generated through the sale of donated goods are invested in our people, community, mission and future.

Our work, community and financial programs and services support our mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment.

We will advance our mission through these guiding principles:

-Practice mission-based (our why) decision–making at all times.
-Attract and retain talented team members.
-Know the business, understand what we are doing and the related outcomes.
-Focus on the experience of our customers and our team members.
-Innovate and grow to impact the needs of our communities.
-Be good stewards of the communities’ resources.

According to our CARF survey, "Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin demonstrates substantial conformance to the standards. Goodwill NCW provides high-quality services to the clients served in the northwest region of Wisconsin. The organization has strong leadership and staff and is committed to its mission of serving people with disabilities. The organization is invested in strategic planning and demonstrates capable financial practices to manage its growth. The organization also has invested in technology to support its business operations and service delivery. The stores are warm, welcoming and inviting and provide a good customer shopping experience and positive working environments for the staff and clients. Its variety of vocational and employment services has earned the satisfaction of the clients and employers. Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin is encouraged to continue to build on its strengths in applying the CARF standards to be the leader of innovative services in the region. There are areas for improvement that should be addressed, including health and safety, workforce development and management, accessibility planning, performance improvement action planning, and enhancing the parameters of service descriptions. Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin is commended for seeking international accreditation in its quest for continuous quality improvement. The organization is encouraged to continue to use the CARF standards as a framework for continuous quality improvement and effective service delivery."

"Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin appears likely to maintain and/or improve its current method of operation and demonstrates a commitment to ongoing quality improvement."

Our retail stores and training centers are mission integrated and provide job training to individuals with barriers to employment. In 2022, Goodwill NCW provided 103,186 hours of on-the job training to individuals within Goodwill NCW retail stores. Goodwill NCW’s career development, job placement and training services play a vital role in helping individuals and the economy return to stability and health.

In addition, Goodwill NCW helped divert more than 51.7 million pounds of items from the landfill. Every donation provided on average three hours of job training and opportunities helping individuals enhance their dignity and quality of life.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 2020 2020 MMEA Form 990 2020 2020 Form 990 - Goodwill NCW 2020 2020 Form 990 - Goodwill Development
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

1.66

Average of 0.71 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.6

Average of 1.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

26%

Average of 28% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $9,130,959 $8,496,338 $6,008,028 $20,854,595 $3,538,733
As % of expenses 10.3% 9.4% 8.0% 21.4% 4.1%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $5,688,344 $5,251,484 $2,966,521 $18,060,749 $819,126
As % of expenses 6.2% 5.6% 3.8% 18.0% 0.9%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $97,482,780 $98,927,975 $81,283,932 $117,178,108 $105,533,077
Total revenue, % change over prior year 2.3% 1.5% -17.8% 44.2% -9.9%
Program services revenue 50.5% 49.7% 47.4% 72.9% 53.2%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.1% 0.3% 0.1% 0.3% 0.7%
Government grants 2.0% 0.0% 2.9% 1.8% 8.4%
All other grants and contributions 44.1% 46.8% 46.5% 47.7% 35.9%
Other revenue 3.2% 3.2% 3.2% 2.8% 1.8%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $88,831,337 $90,405,769 $75,325,279 $97,286,204 $87,066,058
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 1.8% -16.7% 29.2% -10.5%
Personnel 37.0% 36.6% 37.5% 34.2% 42.4%
Professional fees 0.1% 1.7% 1.1% 0.8% 1.0%
Occupancy 3.4% 3.3% 3.8% 3.3% 3.8%
Interest 1.3% 1.7% 0.6% 0.4% 0.4%
Pass-through 1.6% 0.9% 0.8% 0.7% 0.8%
All other expenses 56.5% 55.8% 56.2% 60.6% 51.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $92,273,952 $93,650,623 $78,366,786 $100,080,050 $89,785,665
One month of savings $7,402,611 $7,533,814 $6,277,107 $8,107,184 $7,255,505
Debt principal payment $2,310,461 $1,856,250 $2,401,038 $1,779,998 $1,943,444
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $101,987,024 $103,040,687 $87,044,931 $109,967,232 $98,984,614

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 2.0 2.6 3.6 1.3 2.6
Months of cash and investments 2.0 2.6 3.6 5.4 6.5
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 3.6 4.2 5.5 6.4 7.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $14,888,564 $19,689,706 $22,870,598 $10,880,708 $19,224,627
Investments $0 $0 $0 $32,651,999 $27,758,606
Receivables $551,894 $512,515 $1,423,101 $1,111,250 $1,069,500
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $84,048,536 $84,653,684 $85,289,396 $86,204,602 $87,413,018
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 39.6% 42.3% 45.7% 47.3% 49.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 33.6% 29.9% 27.4% 25.9% 25.7%
Unrestricted net assets $55,574,142 $60,825,626 $63,792,147 $81,852,896 $82,672,022
Temporarily restricted net assets $87,103 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $202,183 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $289,286 $296,799 $612,259 $630,027 $869,289
Total net assets $55,863,428 $61,122,425 $64,404,406 $82,482,923 $83,541,311

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No Yes No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President/CEO

Christian Hess

Chris Hess is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin. Since March 2018, Chris has been leading an organization that lives out its mission of Elevating People by Eliminating Barriers to Employment through its programs and services and retail store and training centers across 35 counties. Before joining Goodwill, Chris previously served as vice president of market development and sales for ThedaCare, a nonprofit healthcare organization. He also has held leadership roles with U.S. Venture and Genco (now FedEx Supply Chain). Chris serves on the board of directors of the Fox Cities Chamber of Commerce and Secura Insurance Companies and on First Business Bank’s Northeast Wisconsin Advisory Board of Directors. He has been named one of Wisconsin’s most influential black leaders. A native of Kenosha, Chris graduated from St. Norbert College in De Pere and earned a master’s degree in business administration from UW-Oshkosh.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Goodwill Industries of North Central Wisconsin Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/04/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Christyn Abaray

Lawrence University


Board co-chair

Vice Chair, DeDe Heid

Heid Music

Honorary Board Member Gregg Curry

McCarty Law LLP

Honorary Board Member Gary Lichtenberg

Retired, financial industry

Christyn Abaray

Lawrence University

DeDe Heid

Heid Music

Chris Hess

Goodwill NCW

Tina Schoner

Greif Inc.

Autumn Anfang

St. Norbert College

Jesse Ostrom

Thrivent Trust Co.

Ricardo Abud

Retired

Craig Huss

Church Mutual Insurance Co. S.I.

Dr. Stephen Shapiro

Gundersen Health System

Randy Van Straten

Bellin Health

Paul Belschner

Base Companies, LLC

Laurie Butz

Capital Credit Union

Mike Lutz

Retired

Jake Williquette

Graystone Consulting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/4/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/04/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.