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Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Macon, GA   |  http://www.goodwillworks.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

EIN: 58-1249683


Mission

Goodwill builds lives, families and communities one career at a time by helping people develop their God-given gifts through education, work and career services.

Ruling year info

1976

President

James K. Stiff

Main address

5171 Eisenhower Parkway

Macon, GA 31206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1249683

Subject area info

Vocational post-secondary education

Continuing education

Employment

Social enterprise

Job services

Show more subject areas

Population served info

Economically disadvantaged people

People with disabilities

Unemployed people

NTEE code info

Goodwill Industries (J32)

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education, Job Training and Career Placement Services

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA) is an autonomous nonprofit organization serving 31 counties in central and northeastern Georgia and four in western South Carolina. The organization has operational headquarters in the Georgia metro areas of Macon-Bibb County and Augusta-Richmond County.

Throughout our 35-county territory we deliver the following services:

Job search, workforce training & career placement services through Goodwill's network of community based Job Connection career centers.

Post-secondary diploma and degree programs in hospitality, health services, industrial trades, and business and technology through Helms College, a Goodwill-affiliated licensed, accredited and federal financial aid eligible vocational career college.

Experiential applied learning job opportunities at one of Goodwill's historic retail training stores or hospitality business enterprises.

Upskilling and reskilling workforce advancement opportunities through Helms Career Education, Goodwill's menu of short-term, low-cost industry recognized career credentialing programs/ Upskilling/Reskilling Career Credentialing Programs.

Job training and placement opportunities for people with disabilities through Goodwill's Good Vocations program.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Low-income people
Working poor
People with disabilities

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Students Enrolled or Participating in Education Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Students

Related Program

Education, Job Training and Career Placement Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of People Who Benefitted from Education, Job Training and Career Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

Education, Job Training and Career Placement Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

People Placed in Employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Unemployed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

Education, Job Training and Career Placement Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In addition to defining Goodwill's goals through 2025, the Strategic Plan provided in the preceding section details the strategies established ensure those goals are achieved.

Dr. Edgar J. Helms, founder of Goodwill Industries, worked passionately to establish the first 70 autonomous Goodwill organizations throughout the world. Goodwill's mission has thrived for more than a century and is based upon our belief that we do the greatest good by helping people with a hand-up to develop their God-given gifts through education, work, and career services.

Almost 70 years after Dr. Helms completed his earthly work, Helms College was established by Goodwill Industries of Middle Georgia and the CSRA established Helms College, the first licensed, accredited and Title IV/GI Bill financial aid eligible post-secondary institution in the world to be affiliated with a local Goodwill organization. The more recent additions of Helms College (helms.edu) and Helms Career Education (helmscareereducation.com) give all people the chance to gain the education, experience, and credentials needed to enjoy the “maximum of abundant living."

“Friends of Goodwill, be dissatisfied with your work until every...unfortunate person in your community has an opportunity to develop to his fullest usefulness and enjoy a maximum of abundant living. We are seeking to prevent pauperism rather than relieve it, and to do so by teaching trades to the unskilled and offering self-respecting work...and also training workers to manage their own enterprises."

- Edgar J. Helms

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.07

Average of 0.12 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.2

Average of 0.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

30%

Average of 27% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$867,737 -$187,729 -$3,137,300 $9,858,669 $6,033,263
As % of expenses -2.4% -0.5% -9.0% 23.4% 13.3%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$2,724,881 -$2,018,382 -$5,081,060 $7,666,561 $3,612,900
As % of expenses -7.2% -5.1% -13.8% 17.3% 7.6%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $35,603,028 $37,341,576 $32,155,296 $50,420,104 $50,912,758
Total revenue, % change over prior year 7.0% 4.9% -13.9% 56.8% 1.0%
Program services revenue 47.3% 39.5% 36.1% 26.4% 28.3%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 2.4% 2.1% 1.9% 14.2% 1.3%
All other grants and contributions 50.1% 51.1% 52.3% 53.2% 64.3%
Other revenue 0.0% 7.2% 9.8% 6.2% 6.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $36,216,701 $37,429,303 $34,961,084 $42,151,121 $45,252,668
Total expenses, % change over prior year 10.4% 3.3% -6.6% 20.6% 7.4%
Personnel 64.7% 65.7% 62.2% 61.4% 63.2%
Professional fees 2.7% 2.8% 3.0% 3.9% 3.7%
Occupancy 9.6% 9.7% 12.2% 10.0% 9.7%
Interest 2.4% 2.4% 2.2% 1.8% 1.5%
Pass-through 1.9% 1.1% 1.3% 1.3% 0.5%
All other expenses 18.7% 18.2% 19.1% 21.5% 21.4%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $38,073,845 $39,259,956 $36,904,844 $44,343,229 $47,673,031
One month of savings $3,018,058 $3,119,109 $2,913,424 $3,512,593 $3,771,056
Debt principal payment $0 $636,075 $0 $5,705,749 $948,315
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $2,861,534 $5,033,106 $5,733,528
Total full costs (estimated) $41,091,903 $43,015,140 $42,679,802 $58,594,677 $58,125,930

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.3 0.2 0.6 0.5 0.2
Months of cash and investments 0.5 0.5 0.8 0.7 0.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -0.5 -1.0 -2.2 -2.0 -2.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $875,445 $632,497 $1,699,192 $1,854,959 $734,993
Investments $675,480 $879,800 $553,561 $640,309 $524,772
Receivables $2,469,302 $2,662,459 $2,577,449 $2,247,055 $1,885,267
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $52,612,969 $53,711,631 $56,408,850 $61,557,774 $67,165,617
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 37.9% 40.8% 42.0% 42.2% 42.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 80.0% 85.0% 97.8% 81.3% 79.1%
Unrestricted net assets $8,026,880 $6,008,498 $927,438 $8,593,999 $12,206,899
Temporarily restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total net assets $8,026,880 $6,008,498 $927,438 $8,593,999 $12,206,899

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President

James K. Stiff

Since 1994, James K. Stiff has served as president and CEO of Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the CSRA, which serves 35 counties in Georgia and South Carolina. He holds a bachelor’s degree in human services from Grand Valley State University and a master’s in education and religious studies from Notre Dame Institute. Mr. Stiff is a recipient of the illustrious P.J. Trevethan Award for outstanding contribution to the training and development of Goodwill personnel, the Grand Valley State Distinguished Alumni Award, and the Goodwill Industries International Matthews Entrepreneurial Award.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA)

Board of directors
as of 02/06/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Paul Hart

The Spirit of the 21st Century, LLC

Term: 2022 - 2023


Board co-chair

Matt Mills

Southeastern Real Estate Group, LLC

Term: 2022 - 2023

John C. David

Daviron Healthcare

Stephen Denton, Jr.

Archadeck of Central Georgia

Ruth A. Knox

Retired, Wesleyan College

George N. Snelling

Snelling Properties, LLP

Bennett A. Yort

Merrill Lynch/Bank of America Corp.

Ricardo Bravo

Ricardo Bravo, LLC

James K. Stiff

Goodwill of Middle Georgia and the CSRA

Donald W. Bailey

Middle Georgia Graphic Resource

Verda M. Colvin

Supreme Court of Georgia

Jason Cuevas

Georgia Power

Steven B. Kendrick

Richmond County, Georgia

Raymond H. Smith

SBG Wealth Management, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/5/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/16/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.