Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Helping Youth Find their GREATness!

aka Detroit PAL   |   Detroit, MI   |  https://detroitpal.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

EIN: 38-3314318


Mission

Detroit PAL’s mission, in partnership with the Detroit Police Department and community volunteers, is to build character in young people through athletic, academic, and leadership development programs. Detroit PAL is working to help youth find their greatness; preparing them to become the leaders of today and tomorrow who learn: ● A positive view of law enforcement ● Transferable Life Skills o G – Goal-Setting o R – Resiliency o E – Embracing a Healthy Lifestyle (mentally and physically) o A – Accountability o T – Teamwork ● Detroit PAL Values: Leadership, Responsibility, Respect, Discipline, Diversity, Family, Teamwork

Notes from the nonprofit

Detroit PAL offers year-round programming to more than 10,000 + youth participants in and around Detroit. The majority of PAL participants are in our athletic programs, such as football, cheer, basketball, soccer, baseball, softball, t-ball/coach pitch, golf, tennis, volleyball, and track and field. In addition to athletics, Detroit PAL offers numerous youth enrichment programs, such as Drones, Coding, Chess, Critical Conversations with the Detroit Police Department, Books Before Ball, financial literacy, empowerment workshops, college tours, career exposures, and more. Detroit PAL has been serving youth in the City of Detroit since 1969.

Ruling year info

1997

CEO

Mr. Fred Hunter

Chief Development Officer

Ms. Monica DeJesus

Main address

1680 Michigan Avenue

Detroit, MI 48216 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Think Detroit PAL

EIN

38-3314318

Subject area info

Sports and recreation

Parks

Sports

Youth development

Youth organizing

Population served info

Children and youth

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Parks and Playgrounds (N32)

Other Recreation, Sports, or Leisure Activities N.E.C. (N99)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Affiliations

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What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Sports Programming and Enrichment Programs

Detroit PAL’s mission, in partnership with the Detroit Police Department and community volunteers, is to build character in young people through athletic, academic, and leadership development programs. Detroit PAL is working to help youth find their greatness; preparing them to become the leaders of today and tomorrow who learn:
● A positive view of law enforcement
● Transferable Life Skills
o G – Goal-Setting
o R – Resiliency
o E – Embracing a Healthy Lifestyle (mentally and physically)
o A – Accountability
o T – Teamwork
● Detroit PAL Values: Leadership, Responsibility, Respect, Discipline, Diversity, Family, Teamwork

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Neighborhood Builders Award 2019

Bank of America

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PAL centers its work around three Goals for Youth: 1.) Participants of high character (Respect, Responsibility, Appreciation of Diversity, Teamwork and Leadership); 2.) Healthy and active youth (a minimum of one hour of physical activity at least five days a week); and 3.) Youth who are civically engaged (giving back to their community).

PAL's work with low-income, at-risk Detroit area youth uses athletics as the "hook" to interest kids in its programs and then trains adult mentors and coaches to use Positive Youth Development techniques when working with them. As a result, PAL participants are more likely to avoid negative behaviors such as gang violence, drug and alcohol use, teen pregnancy, truancy and encounters with the juvenile justice system.

PAL's strategies for achieving its goals for youth include training over 1,000 adult mentors each year through its IMPACT training courses, designed in conjunction with MSU's Institute for the Study of Youth Sport. IMPACT gives both new and seasoned coaches tools and tips for working with youth in a positive manner.

PAL also strives to provide clean and safe facilities for play throughout metro Detroit. This entails everything from cutting grass and picking up trash, to providing Port-a-Johns and facilitating repairs such as rebuilding pitchers' mounds and constructing bleachers. PAL also insures a family environment where good sportsmanship is the key by hiring "culture keepers" to monitor games and events.

PAL is skilled in providing youth-centric athletic programming in local neighborhoods where children and families live and play. For decades, the organization has worked directly with the Detroit Police Department to build a presence in local communities. The organization is proud to be one of three Skillman Foundation Core Partners for its ability to reach significant numbers of participants and providing "layered" services to youth.

PAL is also proud of its work with Michigan State University's Institute for the Study of Youth Sport to evaluate its programs and quantify the impact of caring, adult mentors on participants through the national Caring Climate Scale.

PAL continues to increase the number of children it serves each year. With a specific emphasis on its Girls' Initiative, it is growing the number of girls that participate by removing any perceived barriers to participation. PAL also continually reviews its adult volunteer training programs and recently added an IMPACT Continuing Education (ICE) class as a refresher for seasoned coaches.

PAL is also proud of its efforts to better evaluate its programs, both internally and on a national scale. Updated participate surveys now include positive youth indicators such as avoidance of the juvenile justice system and high school graduation rates, as well as questions from the Caring Climate Scale. Results are being compared on a national level; PAL is unique in that it has access to data for thousands of youth, making it one of the largest organizations in the nation tracking the positive benefits of youth sports participation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Detroit PAL serves youth between the ages of 4-18 yrs. old.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

0.05

Average of 5.94 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.3

Average of 7.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2019 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

23%

Average of 29% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

This snapshot of Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $62,733 -$3,077,423 $6,330,509 $473,418 $1,152,060
As % of expenses 2.2% -48.9% 219.9% 11.3% 33.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $8,892 -$3,119,435 $6,311,926 $65,556 $618,522
As % of expenses 0.3% -49.3% 217.8% 1.4% 15.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $6,663,317 $6,208,137 $4,935,263 $4,479,749 $4,071,610
Total revenue, % change over prior year 161.9% -6.8% -20.5% -9.2% -9.1%
Program services revenue 3.7% 3.9% 4.4% 5.3% 5.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.2% 0.2% 0.4% 0.3% 0.2%
Government grants 0.1% 1.5% 1.8% 1.5% 1.9%
All other grants and contributions 95.8% 94.0% 93.3% 93.6% 90.6%
Other revenue 0.2% 0.5% 0.1% -0.7% 2.2%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $2,857,509 $6,291,091 $2,878,989 $4,205,107 $3,467,695
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.2% 120.2% -54.2% 46.1% -17.5%
Personnel 45.7% 19.4% 50.5% 41.4% 46.8%
Professional fees 1.5% 1.3% 1.3% 2.9% 1.5%
Occupancy 7.8% 4.6% 12.4% 7.5% 7.1%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 3.1% 7.3%
Pass-through 0.0% 56.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 45.1% 18.4% 35.7% 45.1% 37.3%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Total expenses (after depreciation) $2,911,350 $6,333,103 $2,897,572 $4,612,969 $4,001,233
One month of savings $238,126 $524,258 $239,916 $350,426 $288,975
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $558,910
Fixed asset additions $0 $3,818,057 $8,877,226 $3,489,870 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $3,149,476 $10,675,418 $12,014,714 $8,453,265 $4,849,118

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Months of cash 5.2 18.7 18.0 8.0 2.3
Months of cash and investments 5.3 18.8 18.1 8.0 2.3
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 0.3 -5.6 4.3 2.3 3.5
Balance sheet composition info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Cash $1,237,052 $9,807,113 $4,325,147 $2,818,659 $665,140
Investments $25,130 $25,607 $28,145 $0 $0
Receivables $3,194,943 $382,857 $1,182,925 $429,622 $380,301
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $1,231,691 $4,420,801 $12,837,042 $16,274,314 $16,591,901
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 92.0% 12.4% 0.8% 2.8% 5.6%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 2.3% 82.8% 75.5% 77.3% 74.6%
Unrestricted net assets $166,539 -$2,952,896 $3,359,030 $3,424,586 $4,043,108
Temporarily restricted net assets $4,282,252 $5,361,723 $1,091,521 $0 N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 $916,517 N/A
Total restricted net assets $4,307,252 $5,386,723 $1,116,521 $916,517 $373,034
Total net assets $4,473,791 $2,433,827 $4,475,551 $4,341,103 $4,416,142

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Mr. Fred Hunter

Fred Hunter is the CEO and former Director of Program Administration for Detroit PAL, where he has been a vital staff member since 2000. Previous positions with Detroit PAL include Director of Customer and Community Relations, Director of Quality Assurance (Think Detroit PAL) and Athletic Director (Think Detroit). Areas of expertise include leadership, program development and administration, data evaluation, client service, grant management, and talent development. Fred’s achievements and excellence in leadership have been recognized by numerous organizations. At the 2020 Detroit Choice Awards, he was named a Vanguard Recipient for Non-Profit Leadership. He also received the Michigan Basketball Garner Leadership and Grote Hustle Awards. Fred serves as Board Vice President for Link School of the Arts. A Michigan native, Fred attended the University of Michigan, where he received a B.A. in Psychology and was a walk-on and captain of the men's basketball team.

Chief Development Officer

Monica DeJesus

Monica DeJesus is the Chief Development Officer for Detroit PAL. In her current role, which she has held since 2019, DeJesus is responsible for overseeing fundraising, development, marketing, and communications goals/activities for the organization. With more than 25 years of nonprofit philanthropy experience, DeJesus is adept at securing significant donor gifts and forging ongoing relationships with diverse leaders in the corporate, public, and nonprofit sectors. Prior to joining Detroit PAL, DeJesus served as senior development officer for the SME Education Foundation, where she developed donor prospect strategies with the foundation’s board members and was instrumental in securing over $1M in grants and sponsorships. She also served as senior vice president of development for The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History and led corporate and foundation partnership activities for the American Red Cross in both their North Central Division and Southeastern Michigan Region.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Compensation data
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There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Detroit Police Athletic League Inc.

Board of directors
as of 11/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Alan Huddy

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan


Board co-chair

Mr. Dwight Brown, Jr.

DTE Energy

Jessic Berry

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Jonathan Frank

Frank & Frank Law

Alan Huddy

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

April Diez

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Tony Nuckolls

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Damon Tooles

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Josh Barney

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Dwight Brown, Jr.

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Anne Doyle

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Jordan Field

The Detroit Tigers

Steve Grigorian

Detroit Economic Club

Jhonika Hawkins

Detroit Pistons

Jerome Henson

Bank of America

Alan Huddy

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

Danny Jaroshewich

Detroit Lions (retired)

Wendy McIntyre-Peard

ITC Holdings Corp. (retired)

Nakia Mills

Real Digital Strategies LLC

Dan Ngyoi

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Michael Patterson

Ernst & Young LLP

Marvin Rushing

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Dr. E'Lois Thomas

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Shawn Thompson

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Sheriff Raphael Washington

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Steve Wybo

Riveron Advisory Firm

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.