PLATINUM2024

Warrior-Scholar Project

Forged in Service, Fueled by Education

aka Operation Opportunity Foundation   |   Washington, DC   |  www.warrior-scholar.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Warrior-Scholar Project

EIN: 45-2745669


Mission

Our mission is to propel enlisted veterans and service members towards success in higher education and beyond through transformative programming that advances skills, builds confidence, and forges lasting connections.

Notes from the nonprofit

From the student survey of a recent WSP boot camp participant: “I think veterans sometimes sell themselves short. Especially in the enlisted community where many of us join because we don't have a clear path to higher education immediately available after high school. Aside from offering crucial study habits and tools that veterans need to succeed, [WSP] lets us know that we can aim high too.”

Ruling year info

2011

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Ryan Pavel

Main address

1012 14th Street NW, Ste 1200 Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2745669

Subject area info

Education

Student services

Population served info

Low-income people

Students

Military personnel

Veterans

NTEE code info

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Despite the unique work experience transitioning veterans bring to their academic careers, they face singular difficulties adjusting to, and succeeding in, a higher education environment. WSP’s veteran-led and delivered service model is unique in that it is fully immersive and tailored to the needs of its participants. In addition to free participation, veterans are provided all course materials as well as campus lodging and dining during 1- and 2-week boot camps. During the COVID-19 pandemic, WSP successfully pivoted to a remote program delivery model for academic boot camps in 2020, providing all programs virtually (306 program slots). All 20 higher education partners collaborated with WSP to ensure program integrity. Boot camp programming was delivered via Zoom, in three time zones, to cohorts ranging from 8 to 18 student veterans, depending upon the higher education partner. WSP’s focus on limiting virtual boot camp cohort size ensured a high instructor to student ratio, heightened

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Warrior-Scholar Project Courses

Each Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) course is a 1- to 2-week intensive academic experience designed to prepare veterans for the transition from the military to college. During the COVID-19 pandemic, WSP successfully pivoted to a remote program delivery model for academic boot camps in 2020, providing all programs virtually (306 program slots). All 20 higher education partners collaborated with WSP to ensure program integrity. Boot camp programming was delivered via Zoom, in three time zones, to cohorts ranging from 8 to 18 student veterans, depending upon the higher education partner. WSP’s focus on limiting virtual boot camp cohort size ensured a high instructor to student ratio, heightened student veteran interaction, and allowed for the delivery of robust educational supports. As with on-site programming, host institution faculty volunteered their time to teach; writing instructors, writing tutors, and STEM research project leaders worked one-on-one with student veterans; and program delivery was facilitated by WSP alumni fellows. To maintain engagement levels during 1- and 2-week programming, WSP’s virtual service model includes breakout sessions, enhanced coaching/mentoring, and alumni panel discussions.

Despite challenges arising from the pandemic, WSP expanded its partnerships by 10% in 2020, standing up new collaborations with Williams College, Caltech, and the University of Michigan. In addition, WSP expanded its collaboration with the University of Notre Dame to offer a Business & Entrepreneurship-focused boot camp in addition to Humanities programming.

Leveraging the success of its virtual engagement service models, in November of 2020, WSP launched the Women Veterans Empowerment Dialogues program (WVED) -- facilitated, remote conversations that highlight strategies for women veterans to balance career, education, and personal challenges and priorities. WSP is continuing to hold WVED events bi-monthly.

Whether one or two weeks, each WSP course includes:
*Mentorship from fellow enlisted veterans who have successfully transitioned from the military to college;
*Seminar discussions with distinguished college and university faculty;
*Intensive writing workshops led by university writing instructors;
*Focused discussions with student veterans addressing the challenges faced by non-traditional college students;
*Skill-building classes centered on note-taking, time management, test prep, and study skills;
*Advice on navigating the college admissions process;
*Access to academic support from the WSP network following course completion and thereafter.

Boot camp curricula foster the core American values of open inquiry, civil discourse, intellectual humility and curiosity, ideological tolerance, and viewpoint diversity. Programming covers study skills, soft skills, cultural integration strategies, and self-care issues.
Community College Workshops (CCW)

Launched in 2018, WSP’s Community College Workshops (CCW)) is a 1- to 4-day, intensive college preparatory workshop hosted in collaboration with community colleges, veteran service organizations and community-based nonprofits across the country. As 40% of student veterans enroll in community colleges, outreach to, and engagement with, this demographic is critical to WSP’s mission. Programming educates student veterans about the resources available to them; provides them with strategies to break down and analyze complex academic texts; identifies the study skills needed to succeed in a college environment; and fosters interest in and offers on-ramps to participation in a 1- or 2-week summer academic boot camp.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

US Dept of Veterans Affairs 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of enlisted veterans receiving small-class, intensive, immersive college preparatory training as well as community college-based seminars and learning opportunities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Warrior-Scholar Project Courses

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is “To empower enlisted veterans and service members and amplify their voices as civic leaders by providing them with (1) a skill bridge that enables a successful transition to the classroom by making them informed consumers of higher education and increasing their confidence to apply to and complete rigorous degree programs at top-tier institutions, and (2) sustained support throughout their pursuit of higher education and into the workforce.”

We provide intensive one- to two-week intensive humanities and STEM-focused college preparatory courses as well as one-day seminars on college and university campuses across the country. WSP’s Community College Workshops (CCW) is a 1- to 4-day, intensive college preparatory workshop hosted in collaboration with community colleges, veteran service organizations and community-based nonprofits across the country. As 40% of student veterans enroll in community colleges, outreach to, and engagement with, this demographic is critical to WSP’s mission. CCW programming educates student veterans about the resources available to them; provides them with strategies to break down and analyze complex academic texts; identifies the study skills needed to succeed in a college environment; and fosters interest in attending a 1- or 2-week summer academic boot camp. Panel discussions with boot camp alumni provide vital peer-to-peer support and interaction.

Leveraging the success of its virtual engagement service models, in November of 2020, WSP launched the Women Veterans Empowerment Dialogues program (WVED) -- facilitated, remote conversations that highlight strategies for women veterans to balance career, education, and personal challenges and priorities. WSP is continuing to hold WVED events bi-monthly.

Working with our higher education partners, Warrior-Scholar Project is uniquely positioned to deliver on its mission as it has provided veterans with college preparatory training for the past decade. Our evidence-based, veteran led and delivered service model ensures veterans are mentored, supported, instructed, and academically challenged as they transition from the military to academia.

Warrior-Scholar Project has been privileged to provide over 1,400 enlisted veterans and active duty personnel with college preparatory training in the form of intensive one- to two-week academic boot camps, as well as one- and four-day seminars at partnering community colleges. In 2021 and beyond, we will continue to scale our programming, geographically and in terms of curriculum. In addition we will add to our already strong focus on alumni to serve their needs as they segue from higher education to professional school and the workplace.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Warrior-Scholar Project
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31
Financial documents
2022 Final 2022 Audited Financial Statements
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

131.61

Average of 496.26 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

19.8

Average of 11.9 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 11% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Warrior-Scholar Project

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Warrior-Scholar Project

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Warrior-Scholar Project

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Warrior-Scholar Project’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $550,067 $315,639 $1,035,927 $2,613,475 $3,838,774
As % of expenses 33.0% 12.4% 52.2% 98.3% 88.4%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $550,067 $315,639 $1,035,927 $2,613,475 $3,838,774
As % of expenses 33.0% 12.4% 52.2% 98.3% 88.4%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $3,330,699 $2,417,609 $3,448,104 $5,151,688 $6,741,323
Total revenue, % change over prior year 41.5% -27.4% 42.6% 49.4% 30.9%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 1.3% 2.9% 2.2% 1.4% 2.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 98.8% 97.1% 97.8% 93.6% 105.4%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% -7.6%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,668,405 $2,536,919 $1,983,060 $2,657,893 $4,341,239
Total expenses, % change over prior year 34.0% 52.1% -21.8% 34.0% 63.3%
Personnel 44.5% 51.9% 77.4% 70.7% 56.3%
Professional fees 2.3% 2.8% 5.8% 5.3% 3.0%
Occupancy 1.9% 2.0% 0.9% 0.7% 0.4%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% -0.1% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 51.4% 43.3% 15.9% 23.4% 40.2%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,668,405 $2,536,919 $1,983,060 $2,657,893 $4,341,239
One month of savings $139,034 $211,410 $165,255 $221,491 $361,770
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $255,000 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,807,439 $2,748,329 $2,148,315 $3,134,384 $4,703,009

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 12.9 2.5 11.3 11.9 19.8
Months of cash and investments 23.4 15.5 25.0 29.3 29.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 18.3 13.6 23.6 29.4 28.6
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,786,771 $530,196 $1,867,850 $2,645,309 $7,160,828
Investments $1,467,976 $2,746,603 $2,268,296 $3,853,450 $3,476,168
Receivables $1,332,768 $1,379,886 $2,233,533 $2,292,850 $500,000
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.1% 1.7% 4.7% 0.5% 0.7%
Unrestricted net assets $2,549,561 $2,865,200 $3,901,127 $6,514,602 $10,353,376
Temporarily restricted net assets $2,048,781 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $2,048,781 $1,739,299 $2,248,779 $2,260,937 $740,784
Total net assets $4,598,342 $4,604,499 $6,149,906 $8,775,539 $11,094,160

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Ryan Pavel

Ryan Pavel has been affiliated with the organization since 2013. He helped launch the University of Michigan boot camp programming in 2014 and coordinated and directed that program for four years, serving 80-plus participants, and utilizing that experience to help train incoming program directors. Ryan earned a JD from the University of Virginia School of Law, a BA degree from the University of Michigan, and an Associate of Arts from the Defense Language Institute. He enlisted in the Marine Corps in 2005, serving two deployments in Iraq. His teaching experience includes working as a Teach for America corps member at a Detroit high school and as an adjunct instructor of legal reasoning at Virginia Military Institute. Ryan has also worked for a variety of legal organizations, most recently as an associate at a large national law firm.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Warrior-Scholar Project

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

Warrior-Scholar Project

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

Warrior-Scholar Project

Board of directors
as of 02/15/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mark London

London & Mead

Julia Dailey

Holocene Advisors

Matthew Flavin

Concord Energy Holdings

Michael Fotos

Yale Univ

Marla Geha

Yale Univ

Jessica Nelson

Grid North

David Patterson

Brandywine Trust Co

Nick Rugoff

EOTHEN

John Perez

Johnson & Johnson

Catharine Bond Hill

Ithaka S+R

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/15/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/12/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.