PLATINUM2023

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Building an education to employment pathway.

aka STC   |   New York, NY   |  www.schoolsthatcan.org
GuideStar Charity Check

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

EIN: 36-4268793


Mission

Schools That Can builds an education to employment pathway through career readiness programming that’s culturally relevant, youth-centered, and prioritizes real-world experiences and connections.

Ruling year info

1999

CEO

Michael Druckman

Main address

25 Broadway 12th Floor

New York, NY 10004 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-4268793

Subject area info

Education

Job creation and workforce development

Youth development

Population served info

Children and youth

Economically disadvantaged people

Students

NTEE code info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Design Challenge

One-day, real-world challenges during which teams of 7th-8th grade students, their teachers, and corporate partners work in teams to create a solution to a real challenge facing their local cities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Our career readiness programming is culturally relevant, youth-centered, and prioritizes real-world experiences. Spanning 6 units, our program is designed to be built into the school day, focusing on professional communication, financial literacy and budgeting, mock interviews and resume reviews, and helping students build connections with professionals in a variety fields. We work with schools to customize units and order based on their needs. We work collaboratively with classroom teachers: Our student-facing work is led by in-class facilitators who have shared life experiences, help students connect what they are learning to their real lives, and help build capacity during a time of teacher shortages. Our curriculum was created with students in mind, with interactive experiences designed to improve numeracy and literacy skills. Our programming is currently active in Newark, New York, Chicago, and Pittsburgh.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of participants in National Forum

Number of students served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of schools in national network

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Programming Reach - # students served

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Schools That Can aims to build an education to employment pathway in order to address inequities in education and the workforce, increase student engagement in high school, and ensure that all students have access to career readiness opportunities and future job prospects. We work to design and implement career readiness programming that is grounded in real-world experiences and real-world access that ensures students have the skills and support needed to thrive after high school. We primarily serve marginalized youth with a federal free and/or reduced lunch average of at least 80%. Our work supports them in developing employability, social capital, and self-efficacy skulls that can lead to postsecondary success.

Our career readiness curriculum has several key components that make our work unique:
1) We work on the classroom level, with 6 units of programming designed to be built into the school day. We work with schools to customize units based on their needs.

2) We work collaboratively with classroom teachers: Our student-facing work is led by in-class facilitators who have shared life experiences, help students connect what they are learning to their real lives, and help build capacity during a time of teacher shortages.

3) Our curriculum is designed with students in mind, with interactive experiences that are youth-centered and include real-world experience, which improve numeracy and literacy skills, connect students with professionals across fields, and help them build tangible skills and portfolios.

4) With exit tickets collected from students after lessons, we offer schools impact reporting to track the outcomes and efficacy of each unit.

We experienced a 100% increase in students served between the 2021-2022 school year and the 2022-2023 school year. In our pilot work-based-learning ecosystem with a New York school partner, students had a graduation rate of 83% compared to a peer district’s rate of 66%, 90%+ retention for all students, and 100% of seniors received college acceptances.

In addition, we have expanded the scope of our programming to include summer opportunities for students, including units focused on digital presentations and storytelling, and financial literacy and investing. We’re currently expanding our healthcare pathway to launch in spring 2024.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

SCHOOLS THAT CAN
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2021 STC 2021 Audited Financial Statements 2019
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

45.90

Average of 20.45 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13.7

Average of 10.2 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

15%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of SCHOOLS THAT CAN’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

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Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $98,395 $194,916 $194,417 $267,417 $116,937
As % of expenses 6.8% 11.8% 12.7% 17.0% 8.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $98,023 $194,916 $172,367 $267,417 $116,937
As % of expenses 6.8% 11.8% 11.1% 17.0% 8.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,497,894 $1,982,036 $1,640,050 $1,974,355 $1,515,509
Total revenue, % change over prior year 0.0% 32.3% -17.3% 20.4% -23.2%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 10.1%
All other grants and contributions 84.9% 99.8% 99.4% 88.0% 78.1%
Other revenue 15.0% 0.1% 0.4% 12.0% 11.7%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,441,740 $1,652,158 $1,530,787 $1,577,088 $1,341,587
Total expenses, % change over prior year 0.0% 14.6% -7.3% 3.0% -14.9%
Personnel 53.6% 61.1% 61.9% 60.6% 69.0%
Professional fees 11.6% 11.3% 15.6% 19.8% 24.1%
Occupancy 0.5% 1.2% 2.2% 1.0% 1.0%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 34.3% 26.4% 20.3% 18.6% 5.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,442,112 $1,652,158 $1,552,837 $1,577,088 $1,341,587
One month of savings $120,145 $137,680 $127,566 $131,424 $111,799
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $177,500
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,562,257 $1,789,838 $1,680,403 $1,708,512 $1,630,886

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 7.6 6.5 13.1 14.6 13.7
Months of cash and investments 7.6 6.5 13.1 14.6 13.7
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 5.5 6.2 8.1 9.9 12.7
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $917,289 $892,046 $1,670,601 $1,917,523 $1,528,454
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $81,456 $421,401 $136,449 $102,221 $464,322
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $4,943 $4,943 $4,943 $4,943 $4,943
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 4.2% 2.5% 22.8% 13.8% 1.7%
Unrestricted net assets $664,514 $859,430 $1,031,797 $1,299,214 $1,416,151
Temporarily restricted net assets $292,789 $427,751 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $292,789 $427,751 $364,647 $494,461 $545,139
Total net assets $957,303 $1,287,181 $1,396,444 $1,793,675 $1,961,290

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

CEO

Michael Druckman

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

SCHOOLS THAT CAN

Board of directors
as of 12/11/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Michael Druckman

Executive Chairman, Schools That Can

Brian Carr

Highbrook Investors

Nancy Druckman

Art, LLC

Guy Metcalfe

Morgan Stanley

Mark Thaler

Senior Associate & Education Practice Leader

Elizabeth Layne

Appear Here

Jeremy Leventhal

Faros Properties

Matthew Wunder

Da Vinci Schools

Ruth Arnould

Bank of America

John Kushner

Northern Trust

Robert da Silva Ashley

Jones Day

Michael Druckman

Schools That Can

Steve Bloom

Retired

Preetam Dutta

Elpha Secure

Hector Perez

Quantum FBI

Cecilia Marinier

RSA Conference

Riqueza Feaster

Goldman Sachs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/25/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.