PLATINUM2023

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Art thrives when artists do.

aka McColl Center   |   Charlotte, NC   |  www.mccollcenter.org
GuideStar Charity Check

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

EIN: 51-0195015


Mission

We champion contemporary artists and spark creative experiences for positive community impact.

Ruling year info

1976

President + CEO

Alli Celebron-Brown

Main address

721 N Tryon St

Charlotte, NC 28202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

51-0195015

Subject area info

Arts and culture

Arts education

Visual arts

Population served info

Artists and performers

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Visual Arts Organizations (A40)

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The vision of McColl Center is to create a community where contemporary artists and an engaged public enhance their creative capacity through relevant, diverse, and accessible experiences. We frequently promote a welcoming message, “You belong here.” Even though some may see it as intimidating, a stigma we attempt to dispel, contemporary art is an excellent medium for engaging people in extraordinary ways. Our exhibits change at least three times each year, giving many opportunities for our audiences to find something to draw them back to McColl Center. We also align programming with each exhibition and the artists-in-residence. Beginning next year, our exhibitions will evolve to be immersive, dynamic experiences where everyone can participate in creative pursuits.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Artist-in-Residence Program

Founded in 1999, McColl Center for Art + Innovation is a nationally acclaimed artist residency and contemporary art space in Charlotte, North Carolina. Regional, national, and international artists are selected for McColl Center residencies through a combination of open applications, invitations, and solicited nominations. The artist-in-residence program is open to artists working in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, new media, design, or interdisciplinary practices.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of awarded residencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Artists and performers, Activists, Parents, Academics, LGBTQ people

Related Program

Artist-in-Residence Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of professional artists employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars paid to artists

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of classes offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 1999, McColl Center for Art + Innovation, a nationally-recognized artist residency and contemporary art space in Charlotte, NC, has provided studio space and resources for artists to explore their ideas, take risks, and develop their professional practice. By nurturing professional painters, sculptors, composers, photographers, filmmakers, and performance artists at pivotal points in their careers, McColl Center leverages its unique urban setting and our engaged local arts community to help artists advance in their careers. Since our founding 20 years ago, we have supported the careers of more than 420 artists from around the world, including more than 150 from North Carolina. Many alumni artists have returned to McColl Center to exhibit work in the main gallery, to teach workshops, to have their work exhibited at collaborating organizations, and to sell their work.

Working artists, like many people, balance many factors in their lives, and are not always able to focus entirely on exploring their creative drive. By offering paid residencies, McColl meets and exceeds that need by giving artists the time, space, and equipment to focus on their art.

Each artist-in-residence receives housing in a private condo in uptown Charlotte, 24-hour access to a private studio as well as shared studios for ceramics, photography, printmaking, a woodshop and more; assistance with community outreach, marketing, and social media; and expert guidance from an experienced curator. In addition to all of these resources, McColl Center provides a stipend so that artists may more fully focus on their artistic research, exploration, and creation while they are here. McColl Center hosts multiple events during each residency to introduce the artists to the public, potential buyers, and gallery owners so that artists may sell their work to an audience previously unfamiliar with their work.

Another key advantage of the residency at McColl Center is the opportunity to be in a cohort with a variety of artists, each specializing and exploring different disciplines, allowing each person to offer and receive critiques and compliments from esteemed peers and pursue innovative, collaborative relationships with each other. A McColl Center residency is also an opportunity for artists to explore disciplines they may not have had access to in the past.

McColl artists have come from 34 states and 26 countries. More than 1/3 are artists of color.

McColl Center is a 501(c)3 nonprofit arts organization governed by a Board of Directors. We have nine full-time staff members, five part-time staff members and over 30 volunteers. Our unique neo-Gothic building (a former church) features 30,000 square feet with nine individual artist studios, more than 5,000 square feet of exhibition space, and multiple common-use spaces, including a print shop, wood shop, darkroom, media lab, and sculpture studio.

A key focus of our mission is connecting contemporary working artists with the community. Each of the three residency seasons per year includes in-house programming that is free and open to the public. These programs include an evening Open House, where the public first engages with artists after they have settled into their studios; Open Studio Saturday, held in the middle of the residency on a Saturday afternoon with hands-on art-making activities for families and artists to do together; and The Outcome, where the public can learn what the artists accomplished during their residencies. At each of these events, there are free performances and ample opportunities for the public to connect with contemporary art and the artists who create it. We are also open at no charge three days per week so the public can view our many exhibitions and connect with artists working in their studios. We collaborate directly with each artist-in-residence regarding their community engagement goals, and design custom programs to introduce them to non-profits, schools, galleries, other artists, and the public.

In 2019, we celebrated 20 years of supporting artists in all stages of their careers. In the past twenty years since that day, McColl Center has grown into a nationally acclaimed artist residency and contemporary art space. We have provided time, space, resources, and opportunities for more than 420 artists from around the world to explore ideas and grow their creative practice.

In February 2020, McColl Center Board of Directors approved an exciting new Strategic Plan that cements our commitment to being Charlotte’s most prestigious nationally known artist residency program while expanding our support of the local artist community at all stages of their careers. As we implement this plan, some of our programmatic offerings will shift.

Our core program is our artist-in-residence program. In addition to use of the private and shared studio space and equipment, McColl Center artists-in-residence receive private housing adjacent to McColl Center, 24-hour access to our building, marketing support, curatorial guidance, transportation to Charlotte and, a generous stipend. The artist-in-residence program is open to artists working in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, new media, design, or interdisciplinary practices. Local, national, and international artists are selected through an open call. Each application review panel is comprised of curators, alumni artists, national artists, and arts leaders.

In each of our three residency seasons, we offer our signature programs including evening Open Houses and afternoon Open Studios. Usually held on a Thursday night three weeks into the residency season, Open House is when the public first engages with artists. Three weeks gives the artists time to get settled into their studios and begin their work. There are performances during the evening and the event is free and open to all. Another chance for the public to interact with the current artists-in-residence is Open Studio Saturday, which is held in the middle of the residency on a Saturday afternoon. This is a family event, with interactive artist-led activities scheduled for families to do together. Again, this is a free event and open to all.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

McColl Center for Art + Innovation
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2021 FY21 Audited Financial Statements 2019 FY19 Audited Financial Statements
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.99

Average of 1.22 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.4

Average of 3.6 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

13%

Average of 18% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of McColl Center for Art + Innovation’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $155,268 $264,454 $718,968 $153,793 $128,759
As % of expenses 9.1% 19.0% 51.7% 10.0% 7.6%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$45,184 $43,220 $512,368 -$55,211 -$106,925
As % of expenses -2.4% 2.7% 32.1% -3.2% -5.5%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,934,839 $1,161,966 $2,439,387 $1,070,929 $1,530,914
Total revenue, % change over prior year 16.6% -39.9% 109.9% -56.1% 43.0%
Program services revenue 8.6% 3.4% 2.0% 2.1% 3.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.1% 0.1% 0.0% 0.1%
Government grants 9.0% 6.9% 3.2% 30.6% 17.7%
All other grants and contributions 81.9% 78.2% 76.3% 67.2% 60.7%
Other revenue 0.5% 11.5% 18.4% 0.1% 18.5%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,700,372 $1,390,305 $1,391,358 $1,531,366 $1,703,344
Total expenses, % change over prior year -0.3% -18.2% 0.1% 10.1% 11.2%
Personnel 46.4% 47.0% 48.4% 51.5% 52.7%
Professional fees 26.5% 15.0% 19.2% 18.5% 19.2%
Occupancy 9.0% 12.4% 9.3% 11.3% 10.6%
Interest 0.0% 0.8% 0.4% 0.3% 0.0%
Pass-through 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other expenses 18.2% 24.7% 22.7% 18.3% 17.5%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,900,824 $1,611,539 $1,597,958 $1,740,370 $1,939,028
One month of savings $141,698 $115,859 $115,947 $127,614 $141,945
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $100,000 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $0 $618,635 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $2,042,522 $1,727,398 $1,813,905 $2,486,619 $2,080,973

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 0.2 2.1 11.3 9.3 5.4
Months of cash and investments 0.2 2.1 11.3 9.3 5.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets -1.4 0.1 7.3 3.0 4.0
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $29,941 $242,126 $1,305,107 $1,186,501 $762,579
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $120,015 $91,783 $191,244 $101,367 $106,482
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $10,573,235 $9,917,943 $9,359,648 $9,581,509 $9,354,980
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 44.8% 42.2% 43.3% 40.3% 42.1%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.8% 1.8% 2.8% 3.5% 1.9%
Unrestricted net assets $5,595,586 $5,638,806 $6,151,174 $6,095,963 $5,989,038
Temporarily restricted net assets $829,483 $639,938 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $6,490,325 $6,490,325 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $7,319,808 $7,130,263 $7,504,350 $8,792,359 $7,364,490
Total net assets $12,915,394 $12,769,069 $13,655,524 $14,888,322 $13,353,528

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

President + CEO

Alli Celebron-Brown

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

McColl Center for Art + Innovation

Board of directors
as of 10/11/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Laura Smith

Foundation for the Carolinas

Term: 2022 - 2024

David Campbell

Boxman Studios

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/11/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/11/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Contractors

Fiscal year ending
There are no fundraisers recorded for this organization.