PLATINUM2023

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Powering Homes, Powering Lives

aka HEAT Oregon, Oregon Energy Services, Inc. , Oregon HEAT   |   Portland, OR   |  www.oregonenergyfund.org
GuideStar Charity Check

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

EIN: 93-1029893


Mission

To assist Oregonians in financial crisis with their energy bills to support household stability.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Mr. Jesse Brian Allbritton

Main address

1020 SW Taylor Street Suite 620

Portland, OR 97205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Oregon HEAT

Oregon Energy Fund

EIN

93-1029893

Subject area info

Basic and emergency aid

Family services

Housing services

Special population support

Population served info

Children

Seniors

Ethnic and racial groups

Economically disadvantaged people

Low-income people

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Family Services (P40)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

1 in 4 Oregon households struggle to pay their energy bills each year, with many thousands spending more than 10% of their annual income on energy costs. Energy insecurity disproportionately affects marginalized communities, especially Black, Latinx, and Native American households, and can result in missed bill payments, utility shutoffs, eviction, illness, and food insecurity. 1 in 5 households sacrifice food, rent, or medicine to pay for energy each year, putting them at high risk of respiratory disease, heart failure, asthma, and malnutrition. Around 5.5 million Americans resort to payday loans to pay their bills annually, often putting them in greater financial jeopardy, and one 2018 survey suggests that up to 3.5 million people became homeless that year because of their bills.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Energy Assistance Program

Oregon Energy Fund is Oregon's only statewide energy assistance nonprofit. Since 1989, OEF has provided critical financial assistance to more than 300,000 people in all 36 counties, ensuring low-income families can afford to keep the lights on and their homes at safe temperatures without sacrificing basic needs like rent, food, or medicine. In 2021, OEF distributed funds to 3,802 people, including 1,391 children, 499 seniors, and 384 individuals with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors
Children
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

The Victorine Q. Adams Award 2008

National Fuel Funds Network

The Victorine Q. Adams Award 2019

National Energy & Utility Affordability Coalition (NEUAC)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Energy Assistance Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This data represents unduplicated households.

Total dollars distributed for utilities assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Energy Assistance Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

OEF operates on a second-year funding cycle, with funds raised in the first year allocated for spending in the following year. As such, dollars distributed reflect the previous year's donations.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In 2021, 4,274 donors made 10,178 donations; in 2020, 4,710 donors made 10,174 gifts; and in 2019, 4,370 donors made 9,594 donations.

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Oregon Energy Fund, we believe no one should be forced to sacrifice basic needs like food, rent, or medical care to pay for energy. We believe that helping struggling Oregonians with a relatively minor cost – household energy bills – can have major positive ramifications on housing security, wellness, and financial stability, ultimately keeping those families in their homes and preventing a slide into poverty.

OEF operates a variety of programs to help low-income Oregonians avoid the domino effect that often follows a missed bill, all of which prioritize accessibility and follow more flexible income guidelines than government programs. OEF provides direct energy assistance to around 3,000 people each year, helping to lower their household energy burden, foster healthy living conditions, prevent the need to sacrifice rent or food to pay for energy, and prevent utility shutoffs due to bill nonpayment.

These programs also strive to fill the gap left by government energy assistance programs like LIHEAP and OEAP. These programs are only able to help around 17% of energy burdened Oregonians each year, with thousands disqualified due to lack of funding or stringent income requirements. OEF addresses this inequity by accepting applications from clients who earn up to 70% of the statewide median income (a 10% higher margin than LIHEAP or OEAP), and by designing responsive programming for groups with high rates of energy insecurity, including seniors, students, rural residents, people of color, and people with disabilities.

In the last three years, OEF has dramatically expanded its development and fundraising strategies through by implementing an annual donor acquisition campaign, doubling our direct mail appeals to current donors, increasing digital communication through email and social media, and developing a steady grant submission calendar. OEF has also begun actively soliciting large grants and forming long-term partnerships with a number of foundations and agency partners to amplify our current rate of growth.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

48.77

Average of 58.38 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14.6

Average of 6.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 21% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation -$6,118 $59,486 $196,152 $477,958 $15,605
As % of expenses -0.5% 5.4% 17.3% 35.7% 1.2%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation -$21,580 $45,627 $185,306 $463,716 $9,456
As % of expenses -1.8% 4.1% 16.2% 34.3% 0.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $1,111,209 $1,406,034 $1,471,352 $1,621,705 $1,655,425
Total revenue, % change over prior year -1.0% 26.5% 4.6% 10.2% 2.1%
Program services revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 2.0% 2.1% 1.8% 1.2% 1.5%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.0% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 97.3% 97.1% 98.2% 94.8% 98.2%
Other revenue 0.7% 0.9% 0.0% 0.0% 0.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $1,153,561 $1,099,834 $1,134,527 $1,338,058 $1,265,777
Total expenses, % change over prior year -6.0% -4.7% 3.2% 17.9% -5.4%
Personnel 29.4% 35.4% 37.4% 33.8% 33.2%
Professional fees 10.5% 6.9% 6.1% 4.6% 5.0%
Occupancy 3.6% 3.5% 3.8% 2.8% 3.3%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 35.8% 33.6% 33.2% 41.6% 41.6%
All other expenses 20.6% 20.6% 19.6% 17.2% 16.9%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $1,169,023 $1,113,693 $1,145,373 $1,352,300 $1,271,926
One month of savings $96,130 $91,653 $94,544 $111,505 $105,481
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $64,925 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $0 $12,221 $0 $0
Total full costs (estimated) $1,265,153 $1,205,346 $1,252,138 $1,528,730 $1,377,407

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 3.0 5.2 10.6 11.0 14.6
Months of cash and investments 15.0 18.4 23.5 24.2 26.8
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 10.0 11.1 12.7 15.1 16.1
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $288,436 $475,091 $1,006,760 $1,229,091 $1,542,069
Investments $1,150,283 $1,208,850 $1,214,316 $1,473,395 $1,289,386
Receivables $35,734 $129,361 $998 $2,487 $64,725
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $129,722 $129,722 $112,206 $98,984 $101,091
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 71.8% 82.5% 78.6% 90.1% 94.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 1.5% 1.3% 5.1% 2.4% 2.0%
Unrestricted net assets $995,628 $1,041,255 $1,226,561 $1,690,277 $1,699,733
Temporarily restricted net assets $511,709 $791,287 N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 $0 N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $511,709 $791,287 $926,394 $989,339 $1,170,073
Total net assets $1,507,337 $1,832,542 $2,152,955 $2,679,616 $2,869,806

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Executive Director

Mr. Jesse Brian Allbritton

Brian Allbritton has served as the Executive Director of Oregon Energy Fund since 2016. During Brian's time at OEF, he's overseen the launch of several new innovative projects, including OEF's Student and Senior Discount Programs, and is proud of OEF's role in making energy assistance more accessible to Oregonians in need. Prior to OEF, Brian served as the Chief Financial Officer at Trillium Family Services, had a successful career in high tech, and earned his MBA at London Business School.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Highest paid employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of highest paid employee data for this organization

HEAT Oregon dba Oregon Energy Fund

Board of directors
as of 01/23/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Ms. Victoria Bryson

Hoffman, Stewart & Schmidt, P.C.

Term: 2009 -

Marisa DeCristoforo

Consultant

Tyler Richardson

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Sarah Simmons

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David DiMatteo

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Jess Marpe

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Tori Bryson

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Anne Wahr

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Bob Gravely

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Paul Koehler

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Billi Kohler

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Darcy Noxon

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Chukwuemeka Onyia

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Jordan Schoonover

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Charity Spires

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/30/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/01/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.