PLATINUM2024

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Churches of Greater Austin Bringing Hope into Crisis

Austin, TX   |  www.adrn.org
GuideStar Charity Check

Austin Disaster Relief Network

EIN: 26-4789907


Mission

To glorify Christ by equipping, empowering, and mobilizing the Church of Greater Austin to shepherd those affected by disaster and meet their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Rev. Dr. Dwight Bailey Jr.

Main address

13801 Burnet Road, Suite 100

Austin, TX 78727 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-4789907

Subject area info

Disasters and emergency management

Population served info

Adults

Victims of disaster

NTEE code info

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS subsection

501(c)(3) Public Charity

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Tax forms

Communication

Affiliations

See related organizations info

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Through past disasters like 9/11, Katrina, 2011 Bastrop Fires, and 2015 Memorial Weekend Floods, we have quickly found out that our government, local agencies, churches and ministries alone are not big enough to embrace and handle the magnitude of destruction these disasters bring. Specifically government and local agencies are not equipped to minister to the overwhelming emotional and spiritual needs of individuals affected by a disaster.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Disaster Relief Services

Emergency Transportation and Housing
Emergency Financial Assistance
Emotional and Spiritual Care
Call Center Support / Survivor Hotline
Clean-Up Volunteer Labor
Physical Support (Clothing, Bedding, Toiletries, Toys, and other Supplies)
Sponsorship through ADRN’s Disaster Relief Shepherd Program, assisting families through rebuild/repair phase of recovery

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total Disaster Support Aid to Survivors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of disaster

Related Program

Disaster Relief Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

IN 2022, ADRN'S NETWORK OF CHURCHES RESPONDED TO 111 DISASTER INCIDENTS HELPING HUNDREDS OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES BY PROVIDING EMOTIONAL, SPIRITUAL, AND PHYSICAL CARE TO THESE FAMILIES.

Total Number of Families Impacted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of disaster

Related Program

Disaster Relief Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since 2009, ADRN has served 356,000+ survivors, addressing their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Additionally, 4,139 families have received shepherd care through our network of 200 churches.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through past disasters like 9/11, Katrina, 2011 Bastrop Fires, 2015 Memorial Weekend Floods, and Hurricane Harvey we have quickly found out that our government, local agencies, churches, and ministries alone are not big enough to embrace and handle the magnitude of destruction these disasters bring. Specifically government and local agencies are not equipped to minister to the overwhelming emotional and spiritual needs of individuals affected by a disaster. With the threat of future hurricanes, tornadoes, escalating threats of terrorism, biochemical warfare, and pandemic catastrophes, the body of Christ in greater Austin, like Joseph in the Bible, needs to be equipped to respond to the emotional, physical and spiritual needs of these individuals. In preparation for these short and long-term disaster relief efforts, ADRN has developed and trained a network of churches and volunteers to organize, mobilize and connect in the event of a natural or man-made disaster.

Network of Relationships
ADRN Coordinates with local and state government, disaster agencies, businesses, ministries and the local church. We facilitate and assist in communication, building bridges and fostering trust and understanding between the various groups involved.

Disaster Preparedness and Training
We offer a variety of different training classes to prepare Christians emotionally, spiritually and physically for effectively responding in disaster. Our focus is to train them to be prepared and equipped to help their neighbor or city. ADRN also prepares churches to respond to emergencies within their community.

Disaster Relief Operations
We deploy trained volunteers in disaster in multiple areas such as: Incident Command, Trauma and Emotional Care, Chaplaincy, Case Management, Sponsoring Surviving Families, HAM Radio Communications, Call Center Operations, Warehouse, Clean-Up, and more. ADRN has coordinated and managed over 15,000 volunteers in disaster response.

Sectors
ADRN has divided the greater Austin area into 12 sectors and is developing each of those sectors to respond to needs within a matter of hours after a disaster strikes. Each sector will have an ADRN Sector Leader that will organize and mobilize the community of churches, ministries and businesses within the sector to effectively work together.

Disaster Relief Coordinators
Each church, ministry or business participating will be asked to assign a dedicated Disaster Relief Coordinator (DRC) that will act as a liaison between their organization and ADRN.

Sector Leaders
ADRN's Sector Leaders will primarily work with the Disaster Relief Coordinators (DRC) in their sector to develop volunteers, collect data, organize vital resources within their organization, coordinate training, implement the organization's disaster plan, and collaborate with other DRCs within the sector.

Church Designation
Each church that joins the network will be given one of four designations, depending on the size of the church. These categories are: X-Large, Large, Medium or Small. By doing this, it will help us determine the number of families a church community may sponsor, depending on the number of people affected by the disaster.

Ministry & Business Designation
Each ministry and business that joins the network will also be designated as one of six categories: Food, Clothing, Shelter, Furniture, Warehouse, and Transportation. By categorizing ministries and businesses, this will help ADRN determine in advance our network's resources and help us work efficiently and effectively in a timely manner.

Sponsoring Families
Our ultimate goal is to make sure every family affected by a disaster is sponsored by our network of churches to provide for their emotional, physical and spiritual short and long-term needs in an effective, efficient and organized manner. We believe this is the Lord's heart. ADRN will help identify and train Disaster Relief Shepherds (those who will walk with these families) within a church and will provide additional resources to participating churches through our network of ministries and businesses, to help meet these families' needs.

Since 2009, ADRN has served 356,000+ survivors, addressing their physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Additionally, 4,139 families have received shepherd support. With a network of 200 churches and hundreds of trained volunteers, ADRN continues to deliver coordinated disaster response, survivor care, comprehensive training, and customized preparedness planning.

Financials

Austin Disaster Relief Network
Fiscal year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

4.87

Average of 398.73 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

5.4

Average of 5.5 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2022 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

14%

Average of 9% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Financial trends analysis Glossary & formula definitions

Fiscal Year: Jan 01 - Dec 31

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info

This snapshot of Austin Disaster Relief Network’s financial trends applies Nonprofit Finance Fund® analysis to data hosted by GuideStar. While it highlights the data that matter most, remember that context is key – numbers only tell part of any story.

Created in partnership with

Business model indicators

Profitability info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) before depreciation $28,805 $12,166 $277,554 $4,525,900 -$1,155,461
As % of expenses 0.9% 0.3% 5.4% 86.7% -17.7%
Unrestricted surplus (deficit) after depreciation $20,254 -$3,872 $258,625 $4,499,672 -$1,155,461
As % of expenses 0.6% -0.1% 5.0% 85.7% -17.7%
Revenue composition info
Total revenue (unrestricted & restricted) $2,648,971 $3,345,101 $5,300,432 $10,124,383 $4,134,819
Total revenue, % change over prior year -77.2% 26.3% 58.5% 91.0% -59.2%
Program services revenue 0.7% 0.3% 0.2% 0.1% 0.5%
Membership dues 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Investment income 0.0% 0.3% 0.1% 0.2% 0.2%
Government grants 0.0% 0.0% 6.9% 4.8% 0.0%
All other grants and contributions 99.3% 99.3% 92.8% 94.9% 99.1%
Other revenue 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.3%
Expense composition info
Total expenses before depreciation $3,339,188 $3,770,196 $5,105,302 $5,223,044 $6,544,150
Total expenses, % change over prior year -65.8% 12.9% 35.4% 2.3% 25.3%
Personnel 27.9% 47.9% 45.2% 47.1% 55.1%
Professional fees 6.7% 2.1% 2.0% 5.1% 5.3%
Occupancy 2.8% 2.6% 1.9% 1.8% 1.7%
Interest 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Pass-through 49.5% 38.6% 44.5% 30.0% 27.3%
All other expenses 13.1% 8.8% 6.5% 15.9% 10.6%
Full cost components (estimated) info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Total expenses (after depreciation) $3,347,739 $3,786,234 $5,124,231 $5,249,272 $6,544,150
One month of savings $278,266 $314,183 $425,442 $435,254 $545,346
Debt principal payment $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Fixed asset additions $0 $40,224 $0 $84,553 $280,902
Total full costs (estimated) $3,626,005 $4,140,641 $5,549,673 $5,769,079 $7,370,398

Capital structure indicators

Liquidity info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Months of cash 5.6 3.5 2.6 12.9 5.4
Months of cash and investments 5.6 3.5 2.6 12.9 5.4
Months of estimated liquid unrestricted net assets 2.7 2.3 2.3 12.5 2.5
Balance sheet composition info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Cash $1,545,032 $1,087,777 $1,091,045 $5,631,561 $2,919,920
Investments $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Receivables $0 $1,994 $24 $14 $0
Gross land, buildings, equipment (LBE) $85,131 $125,355 $137,593 $222,146 $503,048
Accumulated depreciation (as a % of LBE) 30.2% 33.3% 44.1% 39.1% 17.3%
Liabilities (as a % of assets) 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 13.8%
Unrestricted net assets $810,896 $807,024 $1,065,649 $5,565,321 $1,798,004
Temporarily restricted net assets $827,588 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Permanently restricted net assets $0 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total restricted net assets $827,588 $390,327 $307,903 $580,550 $1,947,838
Total net assets $1,638,484 $1,197,351 $1,373,552 $6,145,871 $3,745,842

Key data checks

Key data checks info 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Material data errors No No No No No

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Executive Director

Rev. Dr. Dwight Bailey Jr.

The Rev. Dr. Dwight Bailey, Jr. is the Executive Director of Austin Disaster Relief Network, and first joined the ADRN team as a consultant in 2021. He is an ordained minister and pastor, serving in vocational ministry for over 29 years and currently serves as one of the pastors and board members at New Life Church in Georgetown, TX. Dwight holds a Ph.D. in Business Management with a specialization in Leadership and Organizational Change, and provides business consulting services through his company DBJDevelopments, LLC. He and his wife Jeanine are the proud parents of two sons, Dwight III and William. They love partnering in the Austin Metroplex for the advancement of the gospel.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Austin Disaster Relief Network

Board of directors
as of 05/10/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Rob Harrell

Rob Harrell

Steve Leach

Acacia Strategic

Bill Neusch

Gibraltar

Dwight Bailey

ADRN

Tom Gardner

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/6/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/06/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.