PLATINUM2023

Street Child US

Every child should be safe, in school and learning.

Washington, DC   |  www.street-child.us

Mission

One in 10 children worldwide is out of school, and the vast majority live in regions experiencing a humanitarian crisis such as conflict, disaster, disease, displacement, or extreme poverty. Street Child is an impact-driven international organization working in these most challenging contexts to ensure that all children are safe, in school and learning.Our goal is to reach 1M most-marginalized children by 2024, supporting them to be safe, in school and learning. Backed by the UN, governments, institutions and private donors, we deliver a holistic package of programs including education, livelihoods and child protection in 20 crisis-affected countries worldwide such as Afghanistan and NE Nigeria. We specialize in working with local level organizations for lasting impact.

Notes from the nonprofit

Street Child US is the US fundraising branch of Street Child Global, a global federation of Street Child offices based across four continents. Branches are legally independent but work closely together to fund the same programs and solve the same challenges. Together, we have supported almost one million children to be safe, in school and learning since the first branch was opened in 2008, in the United Kingdom. We lead on localization for the UN Child Protection Cluster. We have strong partnerships with UNICEF, Education Cannot Wait, the World Bank, and governments in most of our countries of operation. We work with a network of almost 200 local partners.

Ruling year info

2015

Chief Executive

Ms. Anna Bowden

Main address

712 H Street NE Suite 1910

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

47-4281452

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Economic Development (S30)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (W12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

1 in 10 children are out of school. 1 in 4 children who complete school are still not able to write or count. Street Child believes that education is a fundamental human right and the surest pathway to a life free from poverty, so we work with children living in the world's toughest places - who are excluded from the education system, or who live in places where the system does not exist or has collapsed - to go to school and learn to read and write for a brighter future. One-third of the world's out-of-school children live in disaster and conflict-affected countries. This percentage is rising annually, yet only 2% of humanitarian funds are spent on education in these emergency zones. Education in emergencies is therefore a huge growth area for Street Child.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Livelihoods

One in ten children remain out of school and the main barrier is poverty, which has worsened since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many families cannot afford education for their children, either because they need their labor or because of informal school fees (e.g. when there is no government salary for teachers parents must pay it instead) and extra costs such as books and backpacks.

Street Child’s Family Business for Education livelihoods program won a WISE Award for Innovation in Education in 2019, for its unique melding of economic empowerment with social support. The model empowers caregivers to care for and educate their children long-term by supporting them to build a strong, sustainable source of income. It combines a positive parenting approach and support for education itself with practical business training, mentoring, access to savings and cash grants. The program has an 87% success rate - that is 87% of children are still in school two years after our support ends.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

The world’s most marginalized communities living in the poorest and most fragile regions are always hit hardest by crisis, whether conflict, disease or climate change, and experience the greatest losses as a result in terms of education, livelihoods and prosperity.

Lockdowns impact precarious livelihood activities first and hardest, and put the most marginalized communities, who have no reserves or safety nets, at immediate, grave risk. Loss of income threatens starvation, death, vulnerability to exploitation and abuse, and a sharp increase in forced child labor, forced early marriage, and increased teenage pregnancy, reversing decades of advancement in economic growth, wellbeing, and educational outcomes.

Without access to immediate, basic relief, the impact of crisis is catastrophic, so we leverage local partnerships and expertise to get food and supplies to people as quickly as possible, and kick-start education and income generation.

Population(s) Served

Our award-winning education programs are based on the belief that education is not only a fundamental human right but also the surest pathway out of poverty. We work with the world's most marginalized populations in the world's toughest areas, where access to school is a challenge, where the quality of education is low, and where children are either out-of-school or at high risk of dropping out.

Our teaching methodology is based on Teaching at the Right Level (TaRL), adapted for low-resource contexts with original TaRL founder Pratham, who is also our technical advisor. We deliver accelerated learning programs and techniques that support children to swiftly achieve the levels of literacy and numeracy they need to either transition successfully into public school and access further education, or to attain and sustain a livelihood.

We also work with communities to build schools, train teachers, promote the importance of education and ensure that all solutions are sustainable long-term.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Local and national organizations will always be frontline responders to crisis in low-resource environments. Integral to the recovery and resilience of their communities, local NGOs have better access than INGOs to affected populations and to the community insights that make interventions relevant. However, local NGOs are underused, underfunded and excluded from decision-making structures.

Street Child sees investing in local NGOs, amplifying their voice and influence, and leveraging local expertise as essential to effective, efficient interventions, and to sustainable longer-term impact. This work forms a core element of our strategy for reaching 1M children by 2024.

We get funding directly into their hands - 59% of our income last year went straight to partners – connect them with international funders; advocate for their inclusion in local humanitarian architecture e.g. UN clusters; build capacity where necessary; and provide surge support for urgent skill gaps.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Awards

WISE Award for Innovation in Education 2019

Qatar Foundation

David M. Rubenstein Prize for Literacy 2022

Library of Congress

LEAP Challenge 2022

Solve MIT / Jacobs Foundation

Dina-Bhadri Honorary Award for our contribution to the development of the Musahar community 2020

Government of Nepal

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 902,999 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of schools repaired or expanded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 1,148 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 12,624 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of financial literacy courses conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Livelihoods

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing cash transfers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Livelihoods

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 44,436 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of adults who received literacy services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Livelihoods

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 2,745 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of people who received clinical mental health care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 149,898 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Number of children with improved water & sanitation facilities at school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We changed the way we collect data in 2020/2021 so it is difficult to report on how the total of 412,955 divides out over the years. That is however an accurate total.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Street Child's goal is to reach 1M most-marginalized children by 2024, supporting them to be safe, in school and learning. We will do so via a holistic package of programs aimed at addressing all the barriers children face to accessing education and living a secure, safe, happy and healthy life.

We aim to reach the

We work in the world's toughest places where the numbers of out-of-school children are highest, because the education system does not exist or has collapsed, or because large groups are excluded. These include Sierra Leone, the poorest country in the world with the lowest rates of literacy when we launched our first program there; Liberia, which will not achieve basic universal education for all children until the year 2100 according to UN scoping, and which has the world's highest per capita percentage of out-of-school (OOS) children; North-East Nigeria, which has the world's highest absolute number of OOS children; and Uganda and Bangladesh, which house the world's fastest-growing refugee crises with huge numbers of refugee children unable to access school; and so on.

We recognize that the barriers to education are complex and interlinked, so we work with local partners to implement targeted, holistic interventions that remove all barriers to quality education – crucial for sustainability and impact. Our integrated interventions include the following:

• Economic empowerment via sustainable livelihoods: Cash grants, leadership & business skills training, mentoring, and access to a savings program to families with out-of-school children, to create and sustain a small enterprise. The program has an 84% success rate. The condition is that recipients must use profit to send at least 1 child to school.
• School repair/construction. Schools in conflict or disaster zones are often unusable, and many rural villages have never had a formal school structure. We build and repair formal structures for year-round learning, to improve learning outcomes and normalize education in regions where it is not prioritized.
• Teacher training. Many teachers have poor literacy or numeracy skills. As well as delivering a lower standard of education, they are unable to achieve a government salary so pass on teaching costs to parents. Informal fees are a huge barrier to education, so we provide funded training programs which upskill teachers and act as a formal pathway to accessing government payroll.
• Child protection. We reunite children with immediate or extended family and strengthen the bonds between child and caregiver through mediation and parenting classes. We also offer trauma counselling and health and safety education, and safe spaces for play.
• Community advocacy & sensitization for the benefits of education (especially for children marginalized by disability, gender, or refugee status) and to promote tolerance and reduce violence against women.
• Self-esteem building and rights awareness. We provide workshops and safe spaces where disadvantaged groups can share experiences e.g. of prejudice, develop skills necessary for independence including resilience and coping mechanisms, and learn about their rights and how to access them.
• Emergency relief. Our networks provide for people’s emergent needs during a crisis e.g. food, water, shelter.

Street Child is an integrated education and child protection nonprofit which provides catalytic funding and support to local grassroots organizations in communities experiencing an education crisis, empowering and strengthening them to design and deliver rapid re-entry programs, and build systems-strengthening sustainability solutions which underpin access to and success in school. Long-term, our goal is to support local communities and organizations to systematically dismantle resource imbalances and create systemic solutions to chronic disenfranchisement.

Operating at the humanitarian-development nexus and working exclusively through local partners, we have over the past decade designed, delivered and adapted for context a multitude of innovative, data-driven interventions aimed at accelerating education access and quality, and fast-tracking educational outcomes, for most-marginalized groups including adolescent girls, refugees / displaced children, children living in extreme poverty, and those affected by disease, disaster and conflict.

Sustainable change, at scale, is only possible if local solutions are mainstreamed into formal systems, so building networks of stakeholders locally, regionally and nationally and connecting solutions is a critical element of our work. Similarly, sustainability on the individual level can only happen if each individual is connected to an entire ecosystem of social, cultural, economic and legal structures necessary for a productive and secure future. We build and facilitate access to employment, health and hygiene, citizenship and voting among other structures, and address systemic discrimination through advocacy and sensitization with stakeholders including employers.

Our work is always delivered by a local actor with links, history, experience and trust with the target community, and based on beneficiary input. We are among very few NGOs to push beyond a simple partnership to intentionally support the development of each local partner to widen their reach and impact. By putting our partners at the forefront of implementation and management, enabling meaningful community participation in program design and delivery, and bolstering links with influencers and international funders, each project fosters a high level of community buy-in, ownership, and sustainability long after Street Child has left.

SC specializes in Accelerated Learning Programs [ALP] and has achieved remarkable literacy outcomes in low resource and emergency contexts. In North East Nigeria, our Right to Learn Project [$230K/6M/Education Cannot Wait] had 50% of students able to recognize letters at the end of the intervention, up from 1% at the start. It was so successful that the project was showcased as an exemplar education-in-emergencies intervention in the 2019 ECW Annual Results Report [https://www.educationcannotwait.org/annual-report/pdfs/ECW2019-Annual-Results-Report.pdf]. In Liberia, a rigorous randomized control trial of Street Child operated schools showed statistically significant [+0.4SD] impact in improving learning at less than a tenth of the cost of other providers within the same trial [https://www.cgdev.org/sites/default/files/beyond-short-term-learning-gains-impact-outsourcing-schools-liberia-after-three-years.pdf]. At a global level SC sits on the Accelerated Education Working Group led by UNHCR with representation from USAID and UNICEF among others, and is a partner of the Global Partnership for Education [GPE].

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Street Child US
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Street Child US

Board of directors
as of 04/27/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Anna BOWDEN

Street Child US

Term: 2022 - 2023

Tucker Malarkey

Sebastian Vollering

Google

Dylan Kohler

Kohlab

Berlina Ceguerra

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/27/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.